Sad Cake – Moist, Chewy, and Delicious

Sad Cake – Moist, Chewy, and Delicious

The Sad Cake is moist, chewy, and delicious!  It stirs up easily in a saucepan.  A mixer is not necessary; just like a brownie, it shouldn’t be beaten.  You simply stir the ingredients together with a spoon and pour the batter into a prepared pan.  Could it be much more simple than that? 

As summer slips away, and the crisp autumn air creeps into our days, certain foods begin to come to mind, don’t they?  For me, Sad Cake is one of those foods and it is such a quick and easy to make dessert.  This moist, chewy, cake has been a family favorite since the 60’s.  My mother brought the recipe home from work.   She has used this recipe a lot when she needed to take a dessert for potlucks, and to this day, she still says the ‘men‘ love it. 

Maybe that’s because there are not a lot of frills to this cake.  It isn’t particularly pretty.  The cake rises nicely in the oven and then falls and the top cracks!  What it lacks in visual, it makes up for in rich decadent taste.  There is no need for frosting.  The cake is rich enough on its own, but a small scoop of ice cream on the warm cake is heavenly, too.  To make it look a little more appealing, you might consider a dusting of powdered sugar.Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Sad Cake

  • 2 sticks (1 cup) Butter ( Not margarine)  
  • 2-1/4 cups Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 cup White sugar
  • 4 Eggs
  • 2 cups Flour
  • 2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla
  • 1 cup Nuts

Preheat oven to 350°

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Place the 2 sticks (1-cup) of butter and the brown sugar into a 3-quart saucepan.  (The batter will be completely mixed in the saucepan.)  Melt the butter with the brown sugar on low heat. Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com 

* Remove from the heat and add the white sugar, eggs, flour, baking powder, and the vanilla. Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

Do not beat.  Stir until mixed.  Stir in the chopped nuts. 

Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Pour the batter into a 9″ x 13″ pan, greased and floured, or a pan lined with non-stick Reynolds Aluminum Foil. 

Bake 40 minutes at 350°.

 

 


Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

*Tips - A few years ago, I bought this set of clear nesting mixing bowls.  These are so wonderful!  Measuring the ingredients into these before adding them to your recipe ensures that you won't forget an ingredient or miscount how many cups!  Not that I have ever done that before... unless I was interrupted by a child or grandchild!

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I also mixed the flour and baking powder together with a wire whisk in the bowl.   Everything was ready to go before the butter was melted.

* I have to confess, I added the white sugar, two of the eggs, the vanilla and half of the flour - baking powder mixture, and stirred that until somewhat blended.  Then, I added the other two eggs and the remaining half of the flour - baking powder mixture.  It's not necessary but easier to mix this way. 

I also use the non-stick wrap.  I love the way you can lift the cake right out of the pan, fold the foil down, and easily cut the cake. 

Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Whoever came up with this recipe might have thought it was a “Sad Cake” but, in my estimation, it would have been more aptly called a bar cookie.  Whatever it is called, it really is delicious and the ‘menfolk’ love it!

 

Sad Cake - Moist, Chewy, and Delicious! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

 

Part 2 – The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

So, I decided to use the cable for the ‘skeleton’, the arms, hands,and shoulders, for this figure.  It’s pliable to begin with, and by the time all of the paper is glued to it, it will be stiffened.  (If he were going to be standing, a more stable frame would probably be necessary.) In  the picture below, you can already see how the arm on the left is becoming more rigid.   The newspaper page I used on the arms is a little heavier than your run of the mill newspaper.

I cut a cable long enough to allow for shoulders and the two arms.  Although I was planning to use PVC pipe for the shoulders, I had a heavy cardboard tube from a package of aluminum foil and decided to use it.   You can see the cable is  crimped up on each side of the tube, which helps hold the tube in place.  I also flattened the cardboard tube in the middle so the pumpkin head could sit on top of it.  (That would have been a lot harder to do with a PVC pipe.)

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You can see how the ends of the cable coating were sliced, splayed, and the wire ends exposed.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, the ends were spread around the ‘arm’ above the wrist and hand and using masking tape, secured the cable to the wrist and hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

My plan was to have the hands positioned like they were pulling the figure up and out of the frame on the bottom of the frame.  Trying to think how I would pull myself out of a frame, I moved his right hand to the bottom and then the left hand to the top corner of the frame.  Then, I saw a picture where the figure was offering one hand, beckoning you to come with him.  Ohhh!  That was perfect!  Now, he will look like he is reaching down and offering a hand to pull you into the frame!

So, I placed the shoulders and arms into the frame.  The piece fits perfectly against the sides of the inner frame walls.  Using eye screws, I can secure the arms to the sides of the frame.

The pumpkin head laid on top of the flattened cardboard tube looked great.  The head will be attached with fishing line or metal wire.  Two little holes drilled into the back will allow the wire to go through one and out the other and attached to eye screws in the frame.  To spread out the load on the wire or line, the wire will be run through an old marker tube.  Then, there will be less stress on the two points where the wire or line touch the pumpkin head.

The space below seemed to need something.  I picked up the sign from the skeleton wreath and placed it there.  Yes, I think a sign there would be perfect.  Now, I need to come up with the perfect words…  Any ideas?

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

In the meantime, the arms, hands, and shoulders will be receiving more Papier mâché and, ultimately, paper clay.  

Click here to see ►Part 1 of How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget.

 

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How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

This is not your typical Halloween ‘Pumpkin Wreath’!  Remember the Skeleton Wreath I made a couple of years ago?  How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWell, I decided to update the decoration, disassemble the skeleton wreath, and the idea of a pumpkin wreath began to take shape in my mind using the black frame again.

James Whitcomb Riley, the Indiana Poet,  and his Little Orphant Annie poem was my inspiration.  My mother read this to us when my siblings and I were little, and believe it, or not, I memorized it.  It is probably my favorite poem of all time, especially the part about the little boy who wouldn’t say his prayers.

No, I didn’t want a sweet little pumpkin wreath.  From Riley’s poem:

An’ the Gobble-uns’ll git you
Ef you
Don’t
Watch
Out!

The vision I had was a creepy pumpkin crawling out of the frame.  That is why I have been making Papier mâché pumpkins.  They were the practice leading up to this ‘Pumpkin Wreath’.  (You can find the instructions for the Papier mâché pumpkins by clicking on the link.)

After making these pumpkins, I can tell  you it is a fun process and I am afraid this Papier mâché has become an obsession…an addiction…  I love it!  There will be more Papier mâché creations!  

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Well, here are some of the elements to begin this wreath.  The pumpkin head has a first layer of paper clay in this picture.  The pumpkin also has a flat back because of the plan to place him in the picture frame.  I also made the hole in the back instead of the bottom.  Hopefully, that was a good decision.

This creepy cloth was found at the craft store.  Wanting some type of pliable wire to create a skeleton for the hands, I asked Dave if we had any coaxial cable (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

It took no time for him to bring this to me.  He even offered to strip the cable, which would have left me with three individual wires but why not use the whole thing?

First, using my hand as a guide and adding length to it for a bigger hand, I cut the cable for the thumb and each of the fingers.How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Then, I cut a double of each of those lengths.  The small finger ended up being 11″, the ring finger  11 -1/2″, the middle finger 13 – 1/4″,  the forefinger 11 – 3/4″, and the thumb – 10″.  These measurements are not critical!  This is a monster!  Use your imagination and create your own!

Lay the cable out with the thumb on one side, the forefinger length next to it, the middle finger, the ring finger, and lastly the little finger section.                                                                  

Gather the cable up, adjust the cable, trying to keep the fingers in the correct position, and wrap masking tape around the “wrist”.  Begin spreading the cable out to resemble the hand.  I kept referring to my own hand to judge where the hand needed to flare and where the thumb would need to be.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You might have seen where other people have used old marker tubes to create the segments of the fingers, which was my original plan, but this cable was thick enough that I didn’t feel like I needed that after all.  I kind of like it being long and skinny.

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

You can see where the thumb was positioned out and away from the forefinger piece and masking tape was wrapped around it.  It is beginning to look like a hand isn’t it? 

The next step was to wrap the entire hand piece with the masking tape.   The tape was used to create the palm and back of the hand.  Small pieces of tape were torn and placed over the ends of the fingers and then each of the fingers was wrapped.  Paper strips and clay will add more detail to the hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

These hands will look like they are pulling the pumpkin figure up and out of the black frame.  At least that is the plan!   You can see I’ve already begun to shape the hands in appropriate positions.  Even though they are easily manipulated right now, after the Papier mâché clay is applied, they won’t be as pliable.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Figuring out the arms and shoulders and adding the Papier mâché will be the next steps.  Part 2 of “How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget” will be shared later this week.

Has this inspired you to create your own pumpkin wreath?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

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