How To Make A Papier-Mâché Lady Snowman

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Lady Snowman

How to make a Papier- Mâché Lady Snowman?  Well, Frosty needed a female counterpart, didn’t he?  Following the same process we used to make Frosty, the lady snowman was created using another newspaper sleeve.  The snowmen will all be somewhat uniform by using the same size plastic newspaper sleeve.    

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I deliberately made this lady snowman a little bit shorter than Frosty, but the process was the same.  Fill the lower portion of the plastic sleeve with wadded up newspaper, tie a knot in the plastic,  make a ball out of newspaper, insert in the sleeve for the head, and tie a knot above this.

Once again, masking tape was used to create the legs.  A twisted sheet of newspaper was used to create shoulders and arms.  I wanted this one to have a little bit of character with her arms up in the air.

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The middle portion, where the twisted newspaper was placed across the back, was flattened to blend in with the body.  Then, it was taped in position.

 

 

 

The newspaper was twisted tighter and taped to resemble arms.  The twisted newspaper was cut the length desired for the arms and the end was folded back and taped, keeping in mind that she was to be wearing mittens.

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I am still making and using the same Papier- Mâché glue and clay used for the Papier- Mâché pumpkins earlier to create these snowmen.  

 

The process of gluing the paper strips to the figure began.  This was also done in a couple of settings.  It just seems that allowing drying time between sessions of applying the glue and the strips, makes it easier to manage.  

After the paper strips were applied and allowed to dry, the soles were applied.

This time, I used the lid of a carryout pizza box to cut out the soles of her feet.  (The cream cheese box was too flimsy.)  The cardboard soles were glued to the bottom of the legs, the figure was supported with a bottle, and the glue was allowed to dry.

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Then, the paper clay was packed in around the ‘feet’, filling in the spaces.  The figure was propped up against a bottle again.  Paper clay was filled in around the neck to support the wobbly head, too.  The clay was allowed to dry.  (This was a good thing!)  It helped to stabilize the head and the base.  I will do this with all of the snowmen!

Then, apply the clay to the body and head.  I usually cover parts of the body, allow that to semi-dry and then fill in around that, until the body is completely covered.  You can see that sections of the body are dried, some semi-dried, and the feet were flattened, leveled, and allowed to dry with the snowman on his back.

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How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Two over-sized buttons made from the paper clay were formed and applied to the front of the snowman’s chest.  A carrot nose was shaped and attached to the face.  Her carrot nose is a little shorter than Frosty’s.  Little pieces of rolled and flattened clay were applied to resemble ruffles at the top of the mittens.  The key to applying these details is blending the edges into the clay where it is attached.  It doesn’t really seem to matter whether that clay is dry or wet.  You can see the clay is in different stages of drying on this snowman in this picture.

 

 


 

 

 The Olympic primer and paint in one was painted over the entire snowman.  (Refer to How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2 for details on this.)How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The carrot nose was painted orange.  The mittens and the buttons were painted green.  A cute little smile and two black eyes were painted on the lady snowman’s face. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, a watered down wash of antiquing medium was painted on in sections and rubbed off with a paper towel.

Next, a thin coat of Mod Podge was painted over the white of the snow lady in sections and, just like Frosty, clear glitter was sprinkled over the glue.  I avoided the black eyes, the mouth, the orange nose, and the green painted areas.

 

Each time I look at these, I have to smile!  Just think, this was made from a newspaper sleeve and wadded up newspaper!  Such humble beginnings and they look so darn cute!

 

Well, the lady snowman needed a hat.  There was red felt in my fabric stash.  I used the same red and green plaid for a neck scarf that was used for Frosty.  (My plan was to buy a coordinating fabric but obligations and grandkids made a shopping trip impossible.) In contrast to Frosty, the red hat and the green buttons and mittens seemed a perfect combination.

So, to begin this hat, I cut out a round piece of scrap paper.  Then, another circle was cut inside of that about the size I thought her head would fit in nicely.

It was a little small.  I widened that inner circle and it fit perfectly.  Now, the brim would be a little too thin.

When the brim was cut from the felt, instead of cutting out another pattern, I just eyeballed it, cutting equidistant outside of that outer circle.  (I could offer a pattern but your snowman head might be larger or smaller.  You can make your own and make the brim wider or thinner.  It is pretty easy to do!)

 

The felt brim was used to cut a crown for the hat.  I just laid the brim on a piece of felt and cut around the outside diameter.  Using a needle and thread, hand baste around the outer edge of the crown as shown in the picture.

Fold the brim in half, left to right, and mark with straight pins.  You could also use chalk to mark if you prefer.  Fold in half again, top to bottom, and mark with straight pins.  Repeat for the crown.  You need to match up the four pins on the brim and four on the crown. 

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Then, matching the straight pins dividing the felt pieces into quarters, pull up the gathering stitches, and begin pinning together the outside edge of the crown piece to the inside edge of the brim piece.  Ultimately, the crown will be wrapped around the brim and the brim will be inside.  Secure the end of the thread to hold the gathering stitches in place. How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

At this point, you can either hand stitch, or use the sewing machine, to stitch the brim to the crown.  Stitch about 1/8″ from the edge.  Remove from the machine and clip the threads.How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Once sewn, the hat can be turned right side out and it is ready to be embellished.  My initial thought was to add the front of an old earring to the hat but I came across this tiny holly and berry and decided it was perfect.  The holly was hot glued to the hat along the edge of the crown. 

How To Make A Papier-mâché Lady Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Another scarf was made in the same way Frosty’s was made only a little bit shorter. 

 

My goodness!  Isn’t she just the cutest thing?  Has this inspired you to make your own lady snowman?  Feel free to leave your comments below!

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The Best Holiday Classic Cheese Ball Recipe

The Best Holiday Classic Cheese Ball Recipe

Need a really tasty classic cheese ball for this holiday season?  You need to look no further!  Searching for a good cheese ball recipe, I came across this winner on Pinterest.  Lauren from Tastes Better From Scratch shared her recipe for a classic cheese ball.  

The ingredients listed seemed to assure a flavorful appetizer.  Cheddar, Worcestershire, Garlic Powder, oregano, green onions, and hot sauce made this recipe sound like a winner.   In the last couple of years, I have made the cheese ball from another recipe and ended up adding more garlic and some other seasonings because the original recipe was too bland for our taste.  This one doesn’t need that!

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In the past, for Thanksgiving, I also formed the cheese balls into a pumpkin shape.  Each was wrapped in plastic wrap and manipulated into a round shape and pumpkin – like gores were formed with my fingers and the help of a rounded chopstick.  Thin slices of cheese accentuated the gore lines.  A thick pretzel was used as the pumpkin stem.  I also got this idea from Pinterest.Follow me here!

Last year, I saw where someone had wrapped the cheese ball in plastic wrap and used large rubber bands to make the indentations in the pumpkin shape!  Brilliant!  I have been anxious to try this new method and it worked perfectly!  I love the results!

The Best Holiday Classic Cheese Ball Recipe on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

So, here, you can compare the two.  I definitely like the newer version better.   Shaping the cheese ball with the plastic wrap, some of the pecans got smashed into the cheeses but it still looks much better.  Don’t you think?

Instead of the pretzel, a piece of celery was used for the stem.  I’ve seen bell pepper stems used as stems, but I didn’t have any of those.  We were fresh out of pretzels, too.  Brainstorming, I came up with the celery.   

I’ve also seen the cheese squares served on a wreath of rosemary and decided to combine the two, with the cheese ball in the center surrounded by the rosemary and the cheese squares.  These were placed on a clear glass platter.  The colorful tablecloth shows through the clear glass.  Be aware that the cheese squares actually pick up some of the rosemary flavor, which is not a problem for me.  I love rosemary.

An assortment of crackers was displayed on a Wilton Armetale platter next to the cheeses. (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales through this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)  We have several pieces of Wilton Armetale and I love them all.  

We had fresh parsley on hand and instead of the teaspoon of dried parsley in Lauren’s recipe, a tablespoon of fresh parsley was used.  The bright fresh green of the parsley and the green onion added color as well as flavor.  Oh, and I doubled the recipe.  Here it is!

 


Classic Cheese Ball

2 – 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese softened
2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese
2 green onions, chopped
1 tsp.Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp. hot pepper sauce
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/3 cup pecans, finely chopped

With a spoon, blend the softened cream cheese and the cheddar cheese together well.  Add the chopped green onion, the Worcestershire, the hot pepper sauce, fresh parsley, garlic powder, oregano, and black pepper.  Mix well.  Shape into a ball with your hands.

Roll the ball into the chopped pecans, covering the entire ball.  Then, place on a sheet of plastic wrap.  Pull the plastic wrap up and around the ball.  Use large rubber bands wrapped around the ball to create the pumpkin – like indentations. The Best Holiday Classic Cheese Ball Recipe on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Refrigerate overnight or for several hours.  Then, remove the plastic wrap and insert a piece of celery for a stem.


Yes, I think this will be a great addition to our yearly Thanksgiving menu.  But, hey!  Christmas is coming and we always have appetizers all day Christmas Eve.  This holiday classic cheese ball will, undoubtedly, be on the menu then, too.

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How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

Part 2 – How To Make A Papier- Mâché Snowman

After the little Papier-Mâché snowman from Part 1 was dry, I realized his feet weren’t so steady.  I had used the cream cheese box to cut out and make soles for his feet.  That cardboard was not so firm and somehow the ends of his feet curled in the front.  As you can imagine, that created a bit of a wobbly snowman.  Extra paper clay had to be applied there and flattened to make him a little more stable, which meant more drying time.  Sigh…

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To remedy this, on the second snowman, a pizza box lid was used to create soles for feet.  Let me tell you that this was a far better idea.   After stuffing the newspaper sleeve, applying the paper strips and allowing that to dry, I glued the pizza box lid soles in the appropriate spots and allowed the Tacky glue to dry.

Then, the paper clay was used to fill in the space around the bottom, creating a nice base.  Paper clay was also applied in a ring around the neck.  The clay was allowed to dry.  This helped to stabilize the head and the base.  I think I will start doing this with all of the snowmen!

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

After the clay had completely dried, a coat of white primer and paint was applied.  I really liked the paint used on the pumpkins as a base but that particular paint does not come in white.  This Olympic primer and paint in one works really nicely, too.

He’s beginning to look more like a snowman now and less like an alien or a troll!  Lol!

 

Remember the Easy DIY Melted Snowman Tablescape from last year?  I had some of the fabric left from the flannel plaid scarf.  This was used to create a little scarf for this first snowman.  The snowman stands about 10″ tall.  The scarf measures 18″ long and ended up being 1 – 7/8″ wide.  The lines of the plaid were followed as a guide to cut straight lines.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Threads were removed from both ends to create fringe.  I didn’t bother to sew up the edges.  They were left raw.  There shouldn’t be a lot of strain on them once they are tied around the little fellow’s neck.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Since the plaid had green in it, too, florist wire was used to create a band for the earmuffs.  (I saw this done on a snowman in a store and thought it was so clever!  However, they had used some black wire.  The florist wire seemed perfect for this project.)

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

His eyes were painted with regular acrylic craft paint.  Since they were supposed to look like coal, they were painted black.  Of course, his carrot nose was painted orange.  Red paint, to match the plaid fabric, was used for the mittens and the earmuffs.  And, he now looks more like a snowman, doesn’t he?

 

 

 

 


How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

A big crooked smile was painted on his face.  White twinkles were painted on his ‘coal’ eyes and white snowflakes brighten up his red mittens.

Frosty was looking a little too bright and new.  A waterbased antiquing medium by FokArt was used to take off the new look.  The antiquing medium was watered down with a wet brush and applied to the snowman in sections.  Then, the surface was quickly rubbed with a paper towel and most of the antiquing medium was removed.  It looks subtle but that is a good thing!

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

After the antiquing was dry, it was time to add some sparkle to Frosty!  A light coat of Mod Podge was brushed on, a section at a time, as glue and then clear glitter was sprinkled over the wet Mod Podge.

I have to tell you right now, looking at this little snowman really puts a smile on my face.

Next, using the Loctite Super Glue, the ends of his coiled band for the earmuffs were glued into the little holes made earlier.

The plaid scarf was the finishing touch.  I love this little snowman!  Another two are in various stages of becoming snowmen, too.  

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How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

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Delicious Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

Delicious Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies came to mind as I gazed at the little container of Quaker overnight oats in the pantry.  Being relatively frugal, I take advantage of the digital coupons that the local Kroger offers.  If you are familiar with those, you know there are “Free Friday Downloads” each Friday.  This little container of overnight oats was one of those freebies. Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

My thought was that Memphis, my granddaughter,  would probably like this for breakfast one morning when she was here for the day.  Well, my daughters had both tried this new product and were not impressed.  Sorry Quaker.  So, there it still sat in the pantry.

 

A thought occurred that I should just make cookies and use it.  (I couldn’t bring myself to just toss it!)  I remembered this recipe for oatmeal chocolate chip cookies from several years ago.  One of the girls at the bank had shared it.  While there was not enough in this little container, there was another container of regular Quaker oats in the cupboard, too.  We had plenty to make this recipe.  

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes 6 dozen cookies

  • 1 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 2 extra large eggs
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 – 1/2 cups oatmeal
  • 4 – ounce Hershey chocolate bar, chopped
  • 2 cups chocolate chips
  • 1 – 1/2 cups roughly chopped nuts

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Preheat the oven to 375°

Then, measure the oatmeal into a food processor and process until fine.   Set aside.

 

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Cream room temperature butter, brown sugar, and white sugar together.  I like to do this with a blunt end wooden spoon.  If the butter is at room temperature, this comes together quickly.

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Next, you add the eggs* and the vanilla.  Stir well.

 

 

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Measure the flour**, salt, baking powder, and baking soda into a medium bowl and stir to combine well.  (This assures that when you bite into a cookie, you don’t get a big bite of salt or baking soda.)

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Add half of the flour mixture and half of the processed oatmeal to the creamed butter, sugar, and egg mixture.  Mix pretty well and then add the remaining flour mixture and oatmeal.Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

At this point, it becomes a little harder to mix the ingredients.  It is easiest for me to use the blunt spoon to scrape and press the last addition of flour and oatmeal into the batter while turning the bowl.

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

Add the chopped chocolate bar and mix well.

 

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Stir in the chopped nuts and the chocolate chips.

With a 1 – 1/2″ ice cream scoop, scoop balls of cookie dough and place 2″ apart on a cookie sheet pan.  Bake in a preheated 375° oven for 10 – 12 minutes. 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Remove to a cooling rack and allow to completely cool before stacking.  

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

Well, the cookies were not even cooled before Dave had eaten two-thirds of the first batch.  Memphis had one. and another, but had to let them cool a little more first.  Yes, they are pretty delicious but we had 6 dozen in total.

One good thing about making this many cookies is that there is plenty to share.  I sent some home with Danielle and Memphis and wrapped up another box to share.  Jon-Michael just happened to stop by and he took the box of cookies home to Emily.  Doesn’t it look neat with the little ribbon?  A dozen of these Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies fit perfectly in the little box.Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

* Tips

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Breaking eggs?  Break your egg by tapping it on the counter, not on the edge of a bowl, a pan, or a skillet!  Egg dropping down the side of the skillet, the counter, the stove, etc. is one of my pet peeves, not that I have a husband who does this.  The key reason for doing this is that the eggshell won't shatter into tiny pieces along the line where it breaks. 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The tendency to get little pieces of eggshell in your food is far less using this technique.




**

Measuring flour?  Well did you know that if you scoop your flour from a container, your measurement is probably inaccurate?

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Just to show you, I scooped a cup of flour from the container where flour is stored.  I poured the flour into a small bowl and then, spooned the flour from the bowl into a measuring cup, and leveled the top.

Notice how much flour is left in the bowl?  I measured it and there was an extra 1/4 cup!  Imagine what that could do to a recipe if you had 3 cups of flour!  Now you know why you should spoon flour into the measuring cup!

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com




Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
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How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman

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To make this  Papier-mâché snowman, first you’ll need newspaper and a newspaper sleeve.  Yep, I used the newspaper sleeve.  It seemed the right size for the snowman I had in mind.  Just imagine a row of these snowmen made from an item you usually toss in the trash…

 

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Since this was a little on the small side, I tore the newspaper in half and used the single sheets to wad into balls.  The balls of newspaper were then placed in the plastic sleeve.  When the sleeve was filled with enough of the newspaper, the plastic bag was tied in a knot.

I wanted legs to be visible.  Using masking tape, I taped the bag creating two ‘legs’.

 

 

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Then, a head was formed.  This was a more compacted ball of newspaper to create a round ball.  That was placed in the sleeve above the body and the knot.  Another knot was tied to hold the ball in place.

 

 

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

As you can imagine, the head was a little ‘wonky’.  In order to make it more stable, I wrapped a piece of masking tape around it.  Awww, perfect!

 

Just like the pumpkins, strips of newspaper were glued to the shape with the Papier-mâché glue.  ◄ (You can find complete directions for making the glue and the clay here.  This makes a lot!  You might want to make half or a third of the recipe unless you are planning on making much bigger or a lot of these!)  I cut the strips for the snowman a little shorter and not as wide as the ones used on the pumpkins.

This was actually done in two settings, allowing the paper strips to dry and stiffen the figure a little before applying them to the head.  Take note, a few strips were applied to the neck area both times to help support the head.

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Once the paper strips were dry and the piece was completely covered, I felt the feet needed a better foundation.  This little snowman has to stand on his own, unsupported.  I had an empty cream cheese box and cut ‘soles’ for the feet from the cardboard box, glued them to the bottoms of the feet, and filled in the gaps with the paper clay.

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

About two-thirds of the body was covered with the paper clay.  You can see the arms are beginning to take shape.  The little fellow was allowed to dry for a day at this point.  In order to hasten the drying, he was set next to the heat register in the kitchen.   (Yes, we already have the heater turned on this year!)

I learned with the pumpkins and the pumpkin stems, that you need to dry areas before applying too much of the paper clay or you might have a collapse.  The stems completely covered in one setting ended up having dropsy.  By covering the base of the stem, allowing it to dry, and then, covering the top, the stems had a better base.  They stand more erect.

Remember that.  You must have patience.  

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Once the lower body was completely covered with clay and dried, clay was applied to the head and some clay was added to his arms.  He was allowed to dry again.  The register expedited the drying process nicely.  He’s beginning to take shape.

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

The idea of having earmuffs on this little guy was inspired by a snowman at a local store.  The band across the top was a spiraled wire and for whatever reason, I just wanted to recreate that look.   It just seemed so clever!

To make them, two equal-sized balls were shaped, flattened, and applied to the wet clay on both sides of the head.  Placing the wet clay on the wet clay helped the two fuse together.  (I wanted definition between the ear muffs and the head.  The wet on wet clay helped create that.  You can blend the wet clay out onto the dry clay and it will adhere easily without a line but in this case, the definition was preferable.)  At this point, you can poke a hole with a toothpick on both of the flattened shapes where the spiraled wire will be attached later.  If you would rather, or forget to do this, a drill can be used to drill a tiny hole for it after the piece has dried.

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

After the Papier-mâché snowman dried overnight, another thin layer of the clay was spread over the head, smoothing out the clay, and subtle cheeks were formed.  You can see that a carrot nose was also shaped and applied to his face.  (Laying him on his back kept the carrot erect instead of drooping.)The eyes were shaped to resemble coal.  I tried to shape ridges on the edges to replicate the edges of chipped coal.  I’m not sure how successful that was but that was the objective.

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

He was laid on his back to add the carrot nose, the coal eyes, and to cover the front with another smooth layer of clay.  At this point, he seems to resemble a troll more than a snowman but we are not done yet.  Another day of drying and working on the back will be the next step.

Part 2 will be posted in the next few days.  I can’t wait to get to the painting part and, ultimately, this little  Papier-mâché Snowman will be glistening, too.  Until then,

How To Make A Papier-mâché Snowman on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

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