Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift

This is such an easy and charming do it yourself, “Will you be my bridesmaid?” gift!   Emily wants her wedding to have an ethereal quality and these little gifts actually have that feel, don’t they? 

When Emily came over to make these gifts, we had a vague idea of how we would create them.  She brought the keys, some tags, and ribbon she found at Hobby Lobby.   She laid out her vision and we began to make it happen.Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

First, I introduced her to PicMonkey.com.

Not only can you edit pictures on PicMonkey, but you can also design cards, posters, labels, etc.  We used one of the Papyrus textures as a background.  (A lot of the features are free but some require an inexpensive membership.  The papyrus texture is one of those.)

Then, Emily chose an overlay from the arboriculture selection.  She decided she wanted one right side up and one upside down.

Next, she chose the text for the names and the “Will you be my bridesmaid?  She chose another typeface for, “The key to my perfect day, would be to have you by my side.”

 

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

It’s easy to move things around and try numerous typefaces until the perfect one is found.  When she was happy with her choice, we saved the card to the computer, changed the name on the card, and saved it to the same file.  The ‘bridesmaid’ on the last two cards was changed to “Maid of Honor” and then, “Man of Honor” and the appropriate names were inserted on each of those.

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

We had thought about gluing the printed cards onto the tags Emily had bought.  After considering, though, we decided to use one of the tags as a template.  The tag was centered on each of the printed cards, the shape was traced with a pencil, and then carefully cut with scissors.  

Then, using the small hole as a template, we marked where the hole would be punched.  We liked it better on the edge versus the top.

The ribbon was threaded through the key and then through the hole.  When you are tying in a case like this, don’t tie a knot!  Instead, thread through the hole, pull up a loop to tie.  Wrap around your thumb, just as you would normally tie, and then pull the loop through.

Tying the knot first makes the bow ‘wonky‘.  It lays nice and flat if you just avoid that first knot.

I asked if she was planning to put these in a box.  She considered that and we talked about small gift boxes.  It just so happened that I had bought a ‘Gift Box Punch Board’ awhile back.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any purchase at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

There was also some decorative paper in my stash, which worked out perfectly.  The sheets were 12″ x 12″ and that size makes a perfect 4″ x 4″ square box.  The instructions are on the punch board and pretty easy.  

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

One piece of paper creates the box.  It folds completely shut and there is no need for a lid.  

A slit on each of the four corners creates the closures.

 

 

 

 

 

Emily had the idea of placing the key and the tag on a bed of moss.  It just so happened that there was a little of the reindeer moss leftover from the Easter egg mantel project this spring.  Regular moss looks nice but it is a little more rough.  The reindeer moss is soft and has a nice smell, too.  It made the perfect soft little bed for the key and tag.   Emily had to make a trip to the dollar store to pick up some more but isn’t it perfect?

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The final step was adding a ribbon.  These are tied with one continuous piece of ribbon.  You can find step by step instructions here►DIY Ribbon Bow.

Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

So, here they are all wrapped up and ready to go!  We are both excited for today when she gets to give these “Will you be my bridesmaid?” gifts to her future attendants!  Wedding dress shopping is on the agenda this afternoon…Will you be my bridesmaid gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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Papier-mâché Pumpkins -part 2- How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -part 2- How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips– How To Make Them – Well, since this was my first experience using this medium, let me tell you that I have learned a thing or two!

Firstly, you need to really exaggerate features with this clay. 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips- How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 (I love this clay and you are witnessing my learning process!)  Thinking that I had exaggerated the features, the pumpkin was set aside to dry and the features began to seem less apparent, especially the eyebrows and the teeth.  If you remember, the picture in the last post did look pretty soggy, right?  

One batch of clay covered most of the small pumpkin and about half of the big pumpkin.  So when this clay dried some, the features shrunk.  

Dave helped me mix up another batch of the clay and this time we mixed in more of the cellulose fiber insulation creating a dryer clay.  There should be less shrinkage with it.  (The paddle worked great for this.  We didn’t have any trouble with it.  I guess the screw and nut worked perfectly.)

More clay was added to build up the brows and the teeth, and once again, the results looked pretty good.  Yes, you can apply this right over top of the dry clay and it adheres perfectly!  Be sure to blend in the edges.  You can see where a crack was filled at the base of the stem, too.  (Cracks are not a big deal.  Imperfections and cracks can easily be filled with the clay.) Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips- How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secondly, I don’t know how Jay or Scott cover the pumpkin all in one day.  Maybe they don’t.  Granted, the clay I used was wetter, but even with the dryer clay, it was too wet to set on any surface, grid or otherwise.  The next pumpkin attempted will begin with covering the bottom half.  That will be allowed to dry, upside down, creating a nice foundation.

When the top half is covered first, there is a lot of weight pressing down on the wet base.  You would be surprised at how much the pumpkin actually weighs.  If the bottom is wet, that extra weight pressing down on it is not a good thing.  Wouldn’t it be better to reverse the process?

Then, the top of the pumpkin and the features will be added.  When the pumpkins above were turned upside down to allow the bottom to dry better, extra care not to smash any features had to be taken.  Wouldn’t it just be easier to do the bottom first?

 

Thirdly, and last, the wetter clay did not brush so well.  After the clay had dried, I rubbed a thin coat of the clay over the outside, a little at a time, and brushed it.  That gave a smoother, more pumpkin-like texture.  From the beginning, the dryer clay from the second batch was easier to brush and achieve the same results.  Being able to apply numerous coats of clay makes this medium fun and easy to use.  

As soon as this smaller pumpkin dries completely, it will be painted all over, inside and out, with flat black latex exterior paint.  Drying is taking a little longer than I thought.  Then, multiple layers of acrylic paint will be applied and lastly, a clear satin coat of polyurethane will be applied.  Just waiting for these Papier-mâché Pumpkins to dry!

 

 

 

 

 

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Papier-mâché – Pumpkins How To Make

Papier-mâché – Pumpkins How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Make Them.  They are much easier than you might think!  Follow these steps for your own one of a kind pumpkin or Jack O’ lantern!

Mulling over where to find pre-made Jack O’ Lanterns for the pumpkin wreath I was imagining, I realized the vision in my mind was just not available in the local craft, sewing, or hobby stores.   Abandoning the idea of the ready-made Jack O’ Lanterns, I considered the faux foam pumpkins and carving them but those aren’t available in the variety of shapes and sizes needed for this project and they are too uniform.  Papier-mâché came to mind.

Ahhh, Pinterest comes to the rescue.  Scott, who has the website Stolloween.com, has several pins featuring his scary homemade Papier-mâché pumpkins.  As soon as I saw his work and videos, I knew this was exactly what was needed for this year’s Halloween wreath!

Another Halloween enthusiast has great how to videos, too.  His name is Jay at UnhingedProps.com and his Halloween Papier-mâché Pumpkin How-To Videos on Youtube are great.  After watching the two, utilizing methods from both of these guys, a plan for making these pumpkins began.


Supplies Needed:

  • Newspaper
  • Plastic grocery bags or Trash bags
  • Twine
  • Masking tape
  • 5 lb. bag of flour
  • 1 cup white glue
  • *1 cup liquid starch
  • Mr. Clean with Febreeze (optional)
  • 1 gallon water
  •         5 gallon bucket
  • Drill with large paint paddle
  • Cellulose fiber insulation(Lowe’s and Home Depot have bales of this for under $10.00.  Check if any bags have been ripped.  Lowe’s sells them at a discount.)
  • Drywall joint compound

* Don’t have liquid starch?  You can easily make your own.  You’ll need water and dry laundry starch or regular cornstarch.  

Boil 1 cup of water in a saucepan.

Mix 1 Tblsp. of laundry starch or cornstarch in 1 Tblsp. of cold water.  Stir cornstarch mixture into the boiling water.  Continue boiling and stirring for about 1 minute.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool before using to make the papier-mâché paste.


Make papier-mâché paste:

Pour the 5-pound bag of flour into a 5-gallon bucket.  Add 1 cup of white glue, 1 cup of liquid starch, 1 cap of Mr. Clean, 1 gallon of water, and mix well.  (The Mr. Clean keeps the mixture smelling a little fresher for a few days.)  Using a drill fitted with a long mixing paddle makes mixing this an easy job.  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and a will receive a percentage of any purchases made from this link.  Thanks for supporting  this website.)

  Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comTip about the mixing paddle – We found this one at Harbor Freight.  In a couple of the reviews on it and on the one at Amazon, the paddles wrapped around the stem of the paddle when they were used to mix thicker ingredients.  The fix was a hole drilled through the weld and a machine screw and bolt.  We decided to do that before testing. When I say ‘we’, I mean Dave.  I decided and he did it.  Why tempt fate?

  •  Pour 2/3 of the paste mixture into another bucket or container with a lid to make the clay later or go ahead and make it at the same time.

Papier-mâché  Clay:

  • Reserved 2/3 of the Papier-mâché paste mixture
  • 1  Spatula of joint compound
  • Cellulose fiber insulation

In a 5-gallon bucket, mix the joint compound into the reserved papier-mâché paste mixture.  Gradually add the cellulose fiber insulation, a little at a time, using the drill and the paint paddle to combine well.  Continue adding cellulose until the mixture is about the consistency of Play-doh.  To keep this from drying out, be sure to put a lid on it when not in use.Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Papier-mâché Pumpkin Directions

First, fill a plastic bag with crumpled newspapers.  Tie the handles at the top together in a knot.

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Shape into a pumpkin likeness. You’ve seen these made from balloons but that creates too much of a perfect shape.   These bags weren’t over-stuffed either.  These little fellows are going to be less ‘perfect’ and a little more twisted.

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Wrap twine around the bag to create ridges resembling a pumpkin.  (On the second one, I didn’t use the twine.  I just used the masking tape.  We’ll see how that works.)

 

  Apply masking tape over the twine to define the ridges more. 

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comCut plenty of strips of newspaper for applying to the pumpkin shape. Using this Fiskars paper cutter,  it made short work of this.  This one is old.  There are much better ones today.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through this link.  Thanks for supporting our website!)   Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWith a paint brush, or your hands, apply paste, and glue at least 3 or more layers of newspaper strips over the entire pumpkin.  The firmer the base is, the more substantial the final product will be.

If you don’t want to have messy hands, the paint brush works well to pick up the strips of paper and apply to the pumpkin shape.  If messy hands don’t bother you, go for it and use both hands, although it does seem the paint brush helps cut down on mess and you will waste less of the glue.  (Don’t you always think of this as a ‘messy’ project?  I used the paint brush. and it really was not!)

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

This bag is a regular bag from the grocery.  Before adding the clay, it measured about 8-inches tall and 13″ x 10″ wide.  You can make yours as big or as little as you please.  I have two of these going at one time.  The second one, the white bag,  is a bit bigger than the first.   Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comYou can see the criss-cross pattern and how they are overlapping each other in this picture.           Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comTo create a stem, twist a piece of newspaper to resemble a stem.  Leave one end untwisted.  Bend the twisted end back on itself and twist together to form the stem.  Cut the untwisted end into strips to glue to the top of the pumpkin shape.

 

I added some Tacky glue to the open twists in the stem and held it for a few minutes to hold the shape.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.)

Cut Out The Face

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Draw the face you want for your Jack O’ lantern.

 Cut out the eyes, nose, and mouth with a sharp X-Acto knife.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website.)   Cut a hole in the bottom of the pumpkin shape for easy removal of the newspaper and plastic bag and also for access to paint the inside later.  The bag and newspaper help support the paper frame while adding the clay.

 (Instead of continually changing out blades, I sharpened the blade with a knife sharpener a few times.)  

After the completely covered pumpkin shape is dry, use the reserved papier-mâché paste to make the clay recipe above, if you haven’t already.  (This recipe is half of what Scott makes up, which is one of each, the paste and clay.  I just mixed up one recipe and made the clay with about 2/3 of the paste recipe.)

Apply The Papier-mâché ClayPapier-mâché - Pumpkins H

 

Starting at the top of the pumpkin above the face, use the papier-mâché clay to emphasize ridges between the indentations formed by the twine and tape.  Cover the stem and make ridges and indentations to look more like a stem.  Smooth the clay out with your hands as you go.  I used my fingers more than my hands.

Begin emphasizing the facial features with clay.  This is where the fun and creativity begin, where the Jack O’ lantern’s personality starts to take shape. Completely cover the pumpkin with the clay, a section at a time, creating ridges and indentations to look like a pumpkin.

 Then, using the papier-mâché paste and your brush, smooth out the clay to look more like pumpkin skin.  

I believe that the clay we made was a little wetter than needed.  It held together really well and was easy to work with but I might try adding more of the cellulose to the remainder.  It was a little wetter than was needed.  This is the nicest clay I have ever used and it is not hard on your hands either!

You might need to let the top dry before applying the clay to the bottom.  If any cracks show up after drying, this medium is very forgiving.  Just add more clay and blend into the surrounding area.  Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

When the surface is completely covered and you have finished all the details, allow the clay to completely dry for a few days.  (I still have a little work to do on this guy.) Set the pumpkin on a grid or something so air can get to the bottom, too.  

Part 2 of this, “Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Make Them” post will be about painting the little fellows!  Give me a few days for drying before that! Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comPapier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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Beautiful Gift Wrapping – Step by Step Ribbon Bows

Beautiful Gift Wrapping – Step by Step Ribbon Bows

Beautiful Gift Wrapping makes any present special. This post will show you how to easily create a beautifully wrapped gift topped with a beautiful ribbon bow.  Wrapping a gift beautifully is such an easy thing to do, but elevates the gift by leaps and bounds.

Have you every had anyone hand you an unwrapped gift and say, ” I got one of these for (insert name), too.”?

Yeah, I have had that happen and yes it made the gift a little less than spectacular.

There is just something special about a beautifully wrapped gift, isn’t there?  Word to the wise, if you bought an identical gift for someone else, keep that to yourself!  Don’t share that with the recipient!

I’ve told you before that I worked in a nice clothing store.  One thing they taught me is that tissue paper elevates any gift.  Inexpensive tissue paper creates a little mystery and adds a little bit of opulence.  Just imagine gently moving layers of tissue paper to the side to reveal a thoughtful gift.  At the store, we also added a little gold seal with the company emblem on it.  (Maybe gold seals with your monogram would be a great idea for this!)

That same gift tossed into a bare box doesn’t create the same feeling now, does it?  Tissue paper is your friend!  (Add a gold seal on it and that takes it to a whole new level!)

How To Fold Tissue Paper

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The first thing you need to do is lay 2 sets of double sheets of tissue paper out flat next to your box.  (This box is 14-1/2″ x 9-1/2″.  If yours is smaller, you might only need 1 set of double sheets of tissue paper.)

 

 

 

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

With one hand, on each side of the doubled tissue paper, pull up a ridge toward the middle of the lengthwise paper.  Pulling the paper up to create a ridge, visually measure and line the tissue up measure the same length as your box.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, create a soft fold so the tissue will fit into the box perfectly.  You can do each double section separately but you want the soft fold to line up and overlap.

 

Lay the tissues in the box, leaving enough overhang on both sides to fold the tissue up over both sides.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Placing The Gift In The Box

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

First, take the clothing off of the hangers.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

In this case, there was a matching panty.  So, the panty was laid on the tissue in the box first.  Debating which way to put the dress in the box, I finally decided to place it in the box sideways.  The dress fit the box best when it was folded in half.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Next, fold the tissue from the bottom up over the dress.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, fold the tissue down from the top.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

Place the lid on the box.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Gift Wrapping How ToBeautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Cut a piece of wrapping paper large enough to wrap around the box and have excess.  (This box was small enough to cut the paper across the width.)

Cut the paper wide enough to give a little excess paper on each end for folding.

I’ve seen people who cut the paper perfectly to size and tape the cut edges.  Doesn’t the folded edge look better?  And, it is more forgiving, too.

 

 

Turn the box upside down!  Place the box in the middle of the paper, making sure the overhanging paper on both sides is equal.  (Yes, that would be the middle…)Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Bring one side of the wrapping paper up over the box and over the edge about 1-inch.  Crease the paper along the edge of the box.  Pull the paper back from the box and run your finger over the entire length and crease on a hard surface.  (The little hand in the picture above is Sophie’s.  She was helping Grammy.)

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Pull the edge that is not folded, snuggly up over the bottom of the box.  Next, pull the folded edge down, over, and line the folded edge up with the bottom edge of the box.

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comBeing careful not to move the box on the paper, lay the folded edge down and tape a generous piece of double sided tape along the edge of the folded paper on the side with the 1-inch overhang.

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Carefully, bring the taped side up, line up the folded edge with the side of the box and press the tape down to secure.

I have seen where others have the seam edge in the middle of the bottom of the box and you can do that.  The seam opening on the edge just seems better to me.

 

On one end of the box, with the seam side up, fold the paper back along the end of the box.  Crease along the box and the over hanging paper creating an angled edge.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next,  hold the paper against the end of the box with one hand.  Make another crease right along the top edge.  Then lay the loose top paper down, fold, and crease it to match.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pull the flap down over the end, crease along the bottom, and with scissors, trim along the crease.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Fold the bottom flap up and over the end of the box.

Crease the paper along the edge of the box.  Lay the flap back down and using your finger, make a nice sharp crease against a hard surface.  Remember, when the gift is top facing up, this flap should face down and toward the bottom of the gift, not facing up toward the top!

Place double sided tape across the top of the inside flap.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Press the flap against the end of the box.  Flip it over, right side up.  Now, it’s ready for ribbons and bows.

 

 

 

 

How to Make Beautiful Ribbon Bows

Don’t you love wired ribbon?  Wired ribbon makes the most beautiful bows!  (If you purchase ribbon through this link, we will receive a small percentage.  Thanks for supporting this website.)  You have probably seen instructions on how to make wire ribbon bows where the loops are clipped in a ‘V’ on both sides in the center.

What?  Why would you do that?  The wire at the base of the bow is no longer supported.  (Maybe I should try it, just to see.)  Well, in the instructions that follow, you can make a beautiful bow that stands tall and it is quite easy!  What’s more,  you can untie the bows and roll the ribbon up and use it again.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The first thing you need to do is wrap ribbon around your package.  There are a few ways to do this but today we will be wrapping the ribbon around the package once, following a row of ducklings.  You will need the package right side up.   Hold the ribbon on each side of the box, lift the package slightly, and position the ribbon under the box.  Cut the ribbon, allowing enough length to tie an overhand knot.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Thread one ribbon over the other.  Pull the ribbon ends up tight and twist slightly.  The wire will hold the ribbon in place.

 

 

Decide how large or small you want the loops of the bow by holding a loop up to the package.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Next, hold the ribbon in one hand and loop the ribbon back and forth, making an even amount of loops.  These can all be the same size or varying sizes.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

Place the loops on the twisted ribbon, pull up the Pull loose tails and thread one tail over the other.

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

Pull on both tails making a tight overhand knot.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

One by one, pull the loops up with your finger inside the loop.  (Don’t smash or crease the loop!)  Twist the loop at the base, tweak, and position where you want each.Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

If you would like to use a satin ribbon, instead of the wire ribbon, and use one continuous piece, check out this post.► DIY Ribbon Bow.  

Beautiful Gift Wrapping – Step by Step Ribbon Bows, it really is pretty easy isn’t it?

Beautiful Gift Wrapping - Step by Step - Ribbon bows on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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How To Make A Beaded Bracelet – 10 Simple Steps

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet – 10 Simple Steps

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet in 10 Simple Steps.  Why would you want to do this?

For just a minute, imagine a nice clothing store that features handbags, accessories, and jewelry that perfectly coordinate with each ensemble.  Years ago, I was the assistant manager of a store which did that very thing.  Shoppers could pull an outfit from a variety of collection pieces, all perfectly coordinating, and then, choose purses, scarves, and jewelry from that same line.

It made putting an outfit together so simple!  There was also a sister store in the same mall, which specialized in Petites.  I loved that store!  Unfortunately, the stores closed many years ago.

An outfit isn’t really finished until jewelry is added though, is it?  It’s like the decorative icing on a cake, the garnish on a great dish.  A piece or two of the perfect jewelry in the perfect color takes an outfit from ‘nice dress’ to wow!  I can’t tell you how many times someone has commented on how the jewelry I was wearing was perfect with the outfit.

One of my frustrations has always been loving bracelets and never being able to find one that fits my small wrists.  Every time I would let my arm down, a bracelet would slip off of my hand.  It was too annoying to deal with that constantly.  Finally, a few years ago, I found little bracelets that had elastic string through them that actually fit.

After taking one jewelry class, I realized custom bracelets would be so easy to make!  Finally, bracelets that would actually fit could be a reality and I’m not talking elasticized bracelets either!  We are talking grown-up bracelets!

Maybe you are that ‘perfect‘ size and the market’s bracelets fit you perfectly but you would like something a little more custom and perfectly coordinated.  Maybe you are a plus size and they don’t fit you correctly, or maybe, like me, the market’s ‘perfect’ size is too big and falls off your hand.

Well, it’s easy to make your own perfectly sized bracelets in any color, metal, or style you want!   With a few basic tools and supplies, you can make custom bracelets you’ll love!

I was inspired this last week when I had my hair colored and styled.  (Tiffany makes it a beautiful red-violet and I love it!)  Mi Salon Spa here in Northern Kentucky has a little boutique, too.  This cute little high-low dress had been tempting me.   Tiffany coaxed me into trying it on in the fitting room.  Sold!

I found some glass beads at the fabric and craft store which match the color of the high-low dress and the idea for a necklace and a matching bracelet was born.  The dress has a black pattern, so, I chose silver spacers with black antiquing and toggle clasps.  (I have wanted a bracelet with a toggle clasp forever!)

There are many other ways, but using the simple techniques that follow, you can make your own  ‘perfectly sized‘ custom bracelet!

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet

Supplies:

bead stringing wire

beads of your choice

spacer beads

toggle clasp or lobster claw clasp

crimp sleeve

crimp cover

 

Tools:

*Chain nose pliars

*Wire cutter

*Bead Crimp Tool

Ruler

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Kate Richbourg has a video on  YouTube, which shows how to string beads and will be very helpful if any instructions here are not clear. – Stringing Fundamentals with Kate Richbourg.

The first thing you need to do is measure your wrist, just below your wrist bone .  Mine is a whopping 5-1/2″.  (Most bracelets are 7″.  That’s an extra 1-1/2 inches.  You see why they fall off of my hands!)

#1  Using a ruler, measure 10″, which will allow plenty of extra wire to work with on each end, and with your wire cutter, cut a piece of the nylon coated beading wire.

#2  Thread one end of the wire through the crimp sleeve and through the ring on the end of the toggle clasp.  Then, thread it back through the crimp sleeve, leaving a 1/2 – 3/4″ tail on one end.

The loop you have created should measure about 1/4″.  You don’t want this too tight.  The loop allows free movement of the wire.

#3  With the bead crimp tool, using the ‘C’ shaped notch, squeeze the pliar firmly over the crimp tube.  The notch should completely cover the sleeve, the sleeve should not be visibly protruding on either side.

There are different sized bead crimp pliars.  Be sure when you buy these that they are the right size for the beads or sleeves you are using.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#4  Place the crimped sleeve in the rounded notch of the pliarsHow To Make A Beaded Bracelet - 10 Simple Steps on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com and squeeze again firmly.  The sleeve should be placed in the notch sideways, not laying flat.

The two channels, created by crimping in the ‘C’ notch the first time, will fold in on each other.  Be sure you crimp this securely.  The crimped ends hold your bracelet together.

 

 

#5  Using wire cutters, cut the short end of the wire as close to the sleeve as possible.

#6  Add a crimp cover by placing the crimp cover in the rounded notch of the crimp pliar and over the crimp tube, completely covering it.  Carefully squeeze the pliar making sure the cover completely closes over the crimp tube.

 

 

 

 

#7  Lay your beads and spacers out on a bead board in your desired pattern, (Bead boards are really inexpensive at the craft or fabric stores.) or lay them out on a piece of felt, velvet, or any plain fabric.  The spacers are good to use with the glass beads, keeping them from grating against each other.

My pattern was very simple, spacer, bead, spacer, bead, etc.  The beautiful beads are the stars of the bracelet, understated and elegant.  Don’t you love it already?

#8  String your chosen beads the length of your wrist measurement.  The toggle or clasp used will add another 1/2″ to the final length.  Wrap the bracelet around your wrist and check the fit.How To Make A Beaded Bracelet - 10 Simple Steps on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

I placed a pattern of beads on the wire measuring  5-1/2″.  When I placed it on my wrist, I felt it needed another bead and spacer to lay the way I wanted it to lay.  (Isn’t it nice to be in control?)  Depending on the size of the bead, the inside measurement which lays against your wrist, may be different than the total length.  You can adjust that by adding beads.

Your bracelet should have enough give to easily lay in a rounded shape.  If you pull the beads too tight, it will be stiff and not lay right.

#9  When the beads are where you want them, place another crimp sleeve on the wire.  Add the other end of the toggle clasp and slide the wire back through the crimp sleeve.  (Remember, just like before, the loop you have created should be about 1/4″. )  Pull up any excess wire.  You want the crimp sleeve to be close to the last bead.

#10  Crimp the sleeve, trim the excess wire, and add a crimp cover by repeating steps #3, #4,#5, and #6.

That’s all there is to it!  In less than an hour, you can have a custom made bracelet that fits perfectly!  Even though I have always been intimidated by jewelry making, I have come to the conclusion that this is not rocket science and anyone can do it!  Have you ever thought of making your own jewelry?

My Secret:

On the first attempt at this bracelet, I wanted to use the wire guards on the wire loops.  That required adding a jump ring.   It just added too much extra silver length and I didn’t like it.  The beads were the star of this show!How To Make A Beaded Bracelet - 10 Simple Steps on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

So, after crimping the sleeve, pushing the beads up, and looking at it, I decided against adding the wire guard.  I cut the wire, disassembled and began over.

 

 

 

And, this is the final beaded bracelet.  It has a toggle clasp!  I love it!

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet - 10 Simple Steps on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet – 10 Simple Steps!

How To Make A Beaded Bracelet - 10 Simple Steps on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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