How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies? Candy Corn JELL-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com The ‘Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts’, which I made a couple of weeks ago, gave me an idea for a Halloween Monster Cookie.  I remembered pinning a cookie resembling a pumpkin with candy corn teeth, which Pillsbury had created.

I was pretty sure that there were some pumpkin cookie cutters in the pantry and after a search, I found some.  Yes,  Wilton has a set of  Halloween pumpkin cookie cutters and we just happen to have a set!  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of any sale from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website.)

Many years ago, I tried a recipe for Old Fashioned Butter Cookies from Land O’ Lakes.  The recipe creates a rich buttery dough that needs to be refrigerated for a couple of hours, then, rolled out, cut, and decorated.  This has been one of my ‘go to‘ recipes for cookies.  A neighbor tried one of those first cookies and in surprise commented that it tasted like one from the bakery.

Anyway, here is that simple recipe:

Old Fashioned Butter Cookies

  • 1 cup Land O’ Lakes butter, softened
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 Tblsp. orange juice
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

 

In a 3-quart mixer bowl, combine butter, sugar, and egg.  Beat on medium sped until light and fluffy.How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Reduce speed to low.  Stir in flour,baking powder, orange juice, and vanilla until smooth and well combined.  (1 to 2 minutes)

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

Chill 2 – 3 hours or until firm enough to be rolled.

Tip – Divide the dough in half.  Place 1/2 of dough on a piece of wax paper.  Fold one end of the wax paper over the dough and flatten into a disk.  Fold the two side edges in and remaining end over the two folded side edges, encasing the dough in wax paper.  Refrigerate the disk for 2 – 3 hours.  The dough is much easier to roll out this way.How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Preheat oven: 400°.

*Roll out dough, 1/2 at a time, on well-floured surface to 1/8″ – 1/4″ thickness.  Cut out with cookie cutters.  (I used the 3″ cookie cutter.  The cookies spread out to make a 3-1/2″ cookie after baking.)

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Place on an ungreased cookie sheet.  Bake near center of 400° oven for 6 to 10 minutes or until golden brown on edges.  Cool on wire rack.  Decorate with icing below.

 

* Tip – When you retrieve the disk of cookie dough from the fridge, open the wax paper, sprinkle a little flour on the top of the dough, and sandwich with another sheet of wax paper.  Roll out a little and flip the whole thing over, remove the wax paper on top, and sprinkle some flour over that side.  Use your hand to distribute it over the disk.  Continue rolling out and adding flour to keep it from sticking to the paper.  It keeps clean up to a minimum and you can easily slip it back into the fridge to firm up before cutting.

Icing Recipe

To Decorate Monster Cookies

  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 Tblsp. milk
  • 2 Tblsp. light corn syrup
  • 1 tsp. orange extract
  • food coloring
Stir the powdered sugar and milk together until smooth.  This will be thick. How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Beat the corn syrup and orange extract into the icing until it is smooth and shiny. How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Divide the icing into small bowls and add the desired food colors to each.How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 At this point,  it should be the right consistency for spreading and drizzling perfectly smooth icing. I used both gel food coloring and regular food coloring.  They both worked equally well for color.

I started out with the black icing to make mouths on each of the cookies.  How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comAs you can see in the picture, paint brushes, which you can find in the bakery section, can be used to smooth out and fill in the icing.

Then, the green stem was added.

By the time I finished those the first cookies were relatively dry.  The orange color was added all round the mouth and under the stem.  By the time I finished the orange icing on all of the cookies, the white around the eyes was added without any issue of the white sinking or bleeding into the orange.

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

These little Candy Eyeballs by Wilton were placed on top of white icing layered on the orange icing to act as glue and exaggerate the eyes.  How cute are these?  The white icing was also applied on top of the mouth to ‘glue’ the candy corn pieces in place.  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of any sales purchased through this link, at no cost to  you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

You can see in the pictures, I deliberately chose one with a larger black dot in the center and one with a smaller dot in the center to make each cookie look a little goofier.

Orange flavoring was added to the icing to echo the orange flavor in the cookies, however, you could easily change the flavoring to suit your taste.

Depending on how big your cookies are and how much area you are covering, you might need more or less icing.  You can half the recipe easily if you think you will need less.

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

How To Make Halloween Monster Cookies?  It’s really pretty simple with this easy to make recipe for cookies and icing!

 

 

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Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint

Part 3 – Papier-mâché Pumpkins  and How To Paint

It took longer than I thought to get to the actual point of painting these pumpkins.  That could be because this is my first experience with this process.   Since the papier-mâché kept shrinking when it dried, I kept feeling like more was needed to actually see the features.  The beauty of this medium is that wet clay can be applied right on top of the dry clay.  You can see how I continued to build up the details in the picture below.

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Supplies

The first thing you need to do is paint the entire pumpkin, inside and out, with a flat black outdoor paint.  You can see I bought a can of Valspar Black 60074 – Flat paint.  Use a can of paint and a paintbrush for this, not a spray can.  The latex paint cleans up easily with soap and water and it also dries quickly.  This will help seal the paper base and create a nice background for the color washes.  

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Although, there is a plastic bin full of acrylic paint, there was no orange.  I had to buy two bottles of orange paint.   One is a pumpkin orange and the other is a darker orange.  Another bottle of yellow paint was used to lighten the pumpkin color a bit.  Varying shades of green, tan, and burnt umber were used on the stem.

The Painting Process

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Scott and Jay each had different techniques for painting their pumpkins.  My technique is a combination of these two.  I like the black showing through the oranges of the pumpkin like Scott does and I like the layering of the color washes that Jay used on his.  The dark recedes and the light comes forward.  Use this to call attention to and highlight certain features.

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Next, white latex primer was lightly dry brushed over the black painted surface.  This accents some of the texture and the raised areas.Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Then, layers of washes of orange paint were applied.  Everyone has their own technique, I guess.  After messing around with it for a while, I tried applying the darker orange wash onto the pumpkin ridges.  Then, with a 2″ dry brush, I feathered that out and down into the valleys.

That was allowed to dry and a coat of the dark orange paint mixed with a little bit of the lighter orange paint was applied in the same way.  The lighter coat  was applied leaving an edge of the darker coat beneath it to show.  Then, the 2″ dry brush was again used to soften and feather out the paint.

Again, the paint wash was allowed to dry.  More of the lighter paint was added to the darker paint and another wash was painted on using the same process.  This was repeated again, and ultimately, the lighter paint was painted on in a wash the same way.

Yellow paint was then added to the light orange in a progression of washes, just like before.

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Personally, I like some of the black showing through.   the texture of the papier-mâché is interesting.   The little fella seems a lot more ominous with all that black.

My intention was to paint the inside a yellow-orange and use a battery-powered candle inside but I like the black showing!   As I looked at him across the room, he looked so perfectly creepy just like that.  His eyes, nose, and mouth are very distinct, and yet, the details of his face are very apparent.

 

Orange paint continued to be layered on top of layers of orange paint, from dark to light.   Then, it dawned on me that if I planned to leave the inside black,  the black would really make ‘a lighter orange color around the facial features’ pop against the darkness.  At that point, more paint was layered around the eyes, the nose, and especially, the mouth.   This area was painted with more pigment and less water.  You can see the difference in the picture above and the picture below.

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The stem was painted a light tan color, brown, and black in striations along the ridges that were made with the clay.  Then, 3 shades of green and some black were mixed and added.   A few  thin strokes of orange were added along the ridges and then feathered out with the 2″ dry brush, leaving just a hint of the orange color.

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins

In case you missed it, directions for making the Papier-mâché

 pumpkin ◄ can be found here.  Click here ► for  Part 2 .

The question of whether to paint the inside lighter or leave the black was posed to ‘MyHumbleHomeandGarden’s Facebook page’ followers◄ You can weigh in with your opinion, too,  leave a comment below, or just see what everyone said!

These are whimsical, and maybe a little creepy, so there is no right or wrong way to do these!  Let yourself go and enjoy the process!  I love the end result and there are more of these crazy pumpkins in my future.  (I also have some ideas of how to use this clay for Christmas ideas!)

 Has this inspired you to create your own Papier-mâché Pumpkins?

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins - how to paint on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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Candy Corn JELL-O Mini Desserts

Candy Corn JELL-O Mini Desserts

Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts!  Aren’t these the cutest?  The inspiration for these was a pin on Pinterest.  It featured a mini dessert which resembled candy corn in a shot glass.  When I saw it, the little mini flare dessert glasses in the cupboard came to mind.  These make any little dessert special!  The shape of these mimic the candy corn better, too, right?  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of any sale from this link.  Thank you for supporting this website!)

Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The grandkids love Jell-O and I knew they would love these, especially when presented like this!

 

This is such an easy mini dessert!

 

 

 

 

Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts

  • 1 (4-serving) box Orange Jell-O Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
  • 1 (4-serving) box Lemon Jell-O
  • Water
  • 1 cup Heavy Whipping Cream
  • 2-1/2 Tblsp. Powdered Sugar
  • 1-1/2 Tblsp. Meringue Powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract

 

 

First, prepare the Lemon Jell-O following the directions on the package.  (I used 3/4 cup of cold water instead of the 1 cup, thinking that the lemon layer would be a little firmer.  Don’t know if it really was necessary!  Lol!)  Then, ladle the prepared Jell-O into the mini flare dessert glasses, filling up the lower half of the glass.  *Place these in the refrigerator to set for 20 – 30 minutes.  You want these to be firm so there will be a distinct edge separating the two colors.

Then, prepare the Orange Jell-O following the directions on the package.  Place the orange Jell-O in the fridge for a few minutes to cool before pouring on top of the lemon layer.  Place back in the fridge to set before topping with the whipped cream topping recipe below, or if you would rather, top with Cool Whip or Reddi-wip.  The whipped cream below is stabilized with Meringue Powder and won’t weep.  You can make it a day ahead and it will stay perfectly!  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of any sale from this link.  Thank you for supporting this website!)

Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stabilized Whipped Cream

Chill a medium-sized mixing bowl and mixer beaters in the freezer for 20 minutes or so.  Pour 1 cup of the heavy whipping cream into the bowl.  Add the 2-1/2 tablespoons of the powdered sugar and beat until thickened.

Mix in the 1-1/2 tablespoons of the Meringue Powder and 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla.  Whip until stiff peaks form.Candy Corn JELL-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Place in a large pastry tube fitted with a large round tip.  Pipe on the top of the set orange Jell-O and top with a kernel of candy corn.

Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

*My tip for you here – use a plastic refrigerator bin to corral mini dessert glasses.   The sides are taller than a sheet pan and keep them from tipping.   It’s much easier to place them in, and take them out of, the refrigerator!

Place silicone potholders in the bottom of the bins.  These grab the base of the glass and keep them from sliding around.  (Ever had unset Jell-O tip over in the fridge?  Not a pretty thing!)  I’m not sure if the spongy silicone potholders would work for this but the firmer ones work great.  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of any sale from these links.  Thank you for supporting this website!)

 

Check out these other Jell-O mini desserts► Strawberry Jell-O Parfait Mini Desserts – 4th of July Firecracker Mini DessertsEasy St. Patrick’s Day Mini Dessert – Apricot Peach Mini Dessert – 

Another Jell-O mini dessert!  Your family is gonna love these “Candy Corn Jell-O Mini Desserts!”

 

Candy Corn JELL-O Mini Desserts on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

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Papier-mâché Pumpkins -part 2- How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -part 2- How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips– How To Make Them – Well, since this was my first experience using this medium, let me tell you that I have learned a thing or two!

Firstly, you need to really exaggerate features with this clay. 

Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips- How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 (I love this clay and you are witnessing my learning process!)  Thinking that I had exaggerated the features, the pumpkin was set aside to dry and the features began to seem less apparent, especially the eyebrows and the teeth.  If you remember, the picture in the last post did look pretty soggy, right?  

One batch of clay covered most of the small pumpkin and about half of the big pumpkin.  So when this clay dried some, the features shrunk.  

Dave helped me mix up another batch of the clay and this time we mixed in more of the cellulose fiber insulation creating a dryer clay.  There should be less shrinkage with it.  (The paddle worked great for this.  We didn’t have any trouble with it.  I guess the screw and nut worked perfectly.)

More clay was added to build up the brows and the teeth, and once again, the results looked pretty good.  Yes, you can apply this right over top of the dry clay and it adheres perfectly!  Be sure to blend in the edges.  You can see where a crack was filled at the base of the stem, too.  (Cracks are not a big deal.  Imperfections and cracks can easily be filled with the clay.) Papier-mâché Pumpkins -tips- How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secondly, I don’t know how Jay or Scott cover the pumpkin all in one day.  Maybe they don’t.  Granted, the clay I used was wetter, but even with the dryer clay, it was too wet to set on any surface, grid or otherwise.  The next pumpkin attempted will begin with covering the bottom half.  That will be allowed to dry, upside down, creating a nice foundation.

When the top half is covered first, there is a lot of weight pressing down on the wet base.  You would be surprised at how much the pumpkin actually weighs.  If the bottom is wet, that extra weight pressing down on it is not a good thing.  Wouldn’t it be better to reverse the process?

Then, the top of the pumpkin and the features will be added.  When the pumpkins above were turned upside down to allow the bottom to dry better, extra care not to smash any features had to be taken.  Wouldn’t it just be easier to do the bottom first?

 

Thirdly, and last, the wetter clay did not brush so well.  After the clay had dried, I rubbed a thin coat of the clay over the outside, a little at a time, and brushed it.  That gave a smoother, more pumpkin-like texture.  From the beginning, the dryer clay from the second batch was easier to brush and achieve the same results.  Being able to apply numerous coats of clay makes this medium fun and easy to use.  

As soon as this smaller pumpkin dries completely, it will be painted all over, inside and out, with flat black latex exterior paint.  Drying is taking a little longer than I thought.  Then, multiple layers of acrylic paint will be applied and lastly, a clear satin coat of polyurethane will be applied.  Just waiting for these Papier-mâché Pumpkins to dry!

Want to keep up with progress on the pumpkins?  Check out and Follow my Facebook page here ◄

 

 

 

 

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Papier-mâché – Pumpkins How To Make

Papier-mâché – Pumpkins How To Make

Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Make Them.  They are much easier than you might think!  Follow these steps for your own one of a kind pumpkin or Jack O’ lantern!

Mulling over where to find pre-made Jack O’ Lanterns for the pumpkin wreath I was imagining, I realized the vision in my mind was just not available in the local craft, sewing, or hobby stores.   Abandoning the idea of the ready-made Jack O’ Lanterns, I considered the faux foam pumpkins and carving them but those aren’t available in the variety of shapes and sizes needed for this project and they are too uniform.  Papier-mâché came to mind.

Ahhh, Pinterest comes to the rescue.  Scott, who has the website Stolloween.com, has several pins featuring his scary homemade Papier-mâché pumpkins.  As soon as I saw his work and videos, I knew this was exactly what was needed for this year’s Halloween wreath!

Another Halloween enthusiast has great how to videos, too.  His name is Jay at UnhingedProps.com and his Halloween Papier-mâché Pumpkin How-To Videos on Youtube are great.  After watching the two, utilizing methods from both of these guys, a plan for making these pumpkins began.


Supplies Needed:

  • Newspaper
  • Plastic grocery bags or Trash bags
  • Twine
  • Masking tape
  • 5 lb. bag of flour
  • 1 cup white glue
  • *1 cup liquid starch
  • Mr. Clean with Febreeze (optional)
  • 1 gallon water
  •         5 gallon bucket
  • Drill with large paint paddle
  • Cellulose fiber insulation(Lowe’s and Home Depot have bales of this for under $10.00.  Check if any bags have been ripped.  Lowe’s sells them at a discount.)
  • Drywall joint compound

* Don’t have liquid starch?  You can easily make your own.  You’ll need water and dry laundry starch or regular cornstarch.  

Boil 1 cup of water in a saucepan.

Mix 1 Tblsp. of laundry starch or cornstarch in 1 Tblsp. of cold water.  Stir cornstarch mixture into the boiling water.  Continue boiling and stirring for about 1 minute.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool before using to make the papier-mâché paste.


Make papier-mâché paste:

Pour the 5-pound bag of flour into a 5-gallon bucket.  Add 1 cup of white glue, 1 cup of liquid starch, 1 cap of Mr. Clean, 1 gallon of water, and mix well.  (The Mr. Clean keeps the mixture smelling a little fresher for a few days.)  Using a drill fitted with a long mixing paddle makes mixing this an easy job.  (We are an affiliate of Amazon and a will receive a percentage of any purchases made from this link.  Thanks for supporting  this website.)

  Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comTip about the mixing paddle – We found this one at Harbor Freight.  In a couple of the reviews on it and on the one at Amazon, the paddles wrapped around the stem of the paddle when they were used to mix thicker ingredients.  The fix was a hole drilled through the weld and a machine screw and bolt.  We decided to do that before testing. When I say ‘we’, I mean Dave.  I decided and he did it.  Why tempt fate?

  •  Pour 2/3 of the paste mixture into another bucket or container with a lid to make the clay later or go ahead and make it at the same time.

Papier-mâché  Clay:

  • Reserved 2/3 of the Papier-mâché paste mixture
  • 1  Spatula of joint compound
  • Cellulose fiber insulation

In a 5-gallon bucket, mix the joint compound into the reserved papier-mâché paste mixture.  Gradually add the cellulose fiber insulation, a little at a time, using the drill and the paint paddle to combine well.  Continue adding cellulose until the mixture is about the consistency of Play-doh.  To keep this from drying out, be sure to put a lid on it when not in use.Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Papier-mâché Pumpkin Directions

First, fill a plastic bag with crumpled newspapers.  Tie the handles at the top together in a knot.

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Shape into a pumpkin likeness. You’ve seen these made from balloons but that creates too much of a perfect shape.   These bags weren’t over-stuffed either.  These little fellows are going to be less ‘perfect’ and a little more twisted.

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Wrap twine around the bag to create ridges resembling a pumpkin.  (On the second one, I didn’t use the twine.  I just used the masking tape.  We’ll see how that works.)

 

  Apply masking tape over the twine to define the ridges more. 

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comCut plenty of strips of newspaper for applying to the pumpkin shape. Using this Fiskars paper cutter,  it made short work of this.  This one is old.  There are much better ones today.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through this link.  Thanks for supporting our website!)   Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWith a paint brush, or your hands, apply paste, and glue at least 3 or more layers of newspaper strips over the entire pumpkin.  The firmer the base is, the more substantial the final product will be.

If you don’t want to have messy hands, the paint brush works well to pick up the strips of paper and apply to the pumpkin shape.  If messy hands don’t bother you, go for it and use both hands, although it does seem the paint brush helps cut down on mess and you will waste less of the glue.  (Don’t you always think of this as a ‘messy’ project?  I used the paint brush. and it really was not!)

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

This bag is a regular bag from the grocery.  Before adding the clay, it measured about 8-inches tall and 13″ x 10″ wide.  You can make yours as big or as little as you please.  I have two of these going at one time.  The second one, the white bag,  is a bit bigger than the first.   Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comYou can see the criss-cross pattern and how they are overlapping each other in this picture.           Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comTo create a stem, twist a piece of newspaper to resemble a stem.  Leave one end untwisted.  Bend the twisted end back on itself and twist together to form the stem.  Cut the untwisted end into strips to glue to the top of the pumpkin shape.

 

I added some Tacky glue to the open twists in the stem and held it for a few minutes to hold the shape.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.)

Cut Out The Face

Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Draw the face you want for your Jack O’ lantern.

 Cut out the eyes, nose, and mouth with a sharp X-Acto knife.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website.)   Cut a hole in the bottom of the pumpkin shape for easy removal of the newspaper and plastic bag and also for access to paint the inside later.  The bag and newspaper help support the paper frame while adding the clay.

 (Instead of continually changing out blades, I sharpened the blade with a knife sharpener a few times.)  

After the completely covered pumpkin shape is dry, use the reserved papier-mâché paste to make the clay recipe above, if you haven’t already.  (This recipe is half of what Scott makes up, which is one of each, the paste and clay.  I just mixed up one recipe and made the clay with about 2/3 of the paste recipe.)

Apply The Papier-mâché ClayPapier-mâché - Pumpkins H

 

Starting at the top of the pumpkin above the face, use the papier-mâché clay to emphasize ridges between the indentations formed by the twine and tape.  Cover the stem and make ridges and indentations to look more like a stem.  Smooth the clay out with your hands as you go.  I used my fingers more than my hands.

Begin emphasizing the facial features with clay.  This is where the fun and creativity begin, where the Jack O’ lantern’s personality starts to take shape. Completely cover the pumpkin with the clay, a section at a time, creating ridges and indentations to look like a pumpkin.

 Then, using the papier-mâché paste and your brush, smooth out the clay to look more like pumpkin skin.  

I believe that the clay we made was a little wetter than needed.  It held together really well and was easy to work with but I might try adding more of the cellulose to the remainder.  It was a little wetter than was needed.  This is the nicest clay I have ever used and it is not hard on your hands either!

You might need to let the top dry before applying the clay to the bottom.  If any cracks show up after drying, this medium is very forgiving.  Just add more clay and blend into the surrounding area.  Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

When the surface is completely covered and you have finished all the details, allow the clay to completely dry for a few days.  (I still have a little work to do on this guy.) Set the pumpkin on a grid or something so air can get to the bottom, too.  

Want to keep up with progress on the pumpkins?  Check out and Follow my Facebook page here ◄

Part 2 of this, “Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Make Them” post will be about painting the little fellows!  Give me a few days for drying before that!

Update – Part 3 – Papier-mâché Pumpkins and How To Paint Them
Papier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comPapier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comPapier-mâché - Pumpkins How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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