How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

Part 2 – How To Make A Papier- Mâché Snowman

After the little Papier-Mâché snowman from Part 1 was dry, I realized his feet weren’t so steady.  I had used the cream cheese box to cut out and make soles for his feet.  That cardboard was not so firm and somehow the ends of his feet curled in the front.  As you can imagine, that created a bit of a wobbly snowman.  Extra paper clay had to be applied there and flattened to make him a little more stable, which meant more drying time.  Sigh…

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To remedy this, on the second snowman, a pizza box lid was used to create soles for feet.  Let me tell you that this was a far better idea.   After stuffing the newspaper sleeve, applying the paper strips and allowing that to dry, I glued the pizza box lid soles in the appropriate spots and allowed the Tacky glue to dry.

Then, the paper clay was used to fill in the space around the bottom, creating a nice base.  Paper clay was also applied in a ring around the neck.  The clay was allowed to dry.  This helped to stabilize the head and the base.  I think I will start doing this with all of the snowmen!

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

After the clay had completely dried, a coat of white primer and paint was applied.  I really liked the paint used on the pumpkins as a base but that particular paint does not come in white.  This Olympic primer and paint in one works really nicely, too.

He’s beginning to look more like a snowman now and less like an alien or a troll!  Lol!

 

Remember the Easy DIY Melted Snowman Tablescape from last year?  I had some of the fabric left from the flannel plaid scarf.  This was used to create a little scarf for this first snowman.  The snowman stands about 10″ tall.  The scarf measures 18″ long and ended up being 1 – 7/8″ wide.  The lines of the plaid were followed as a guide to cut straight lines.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Threads were removed from both ends to create fringe.  I didn’t bother to sew up the edges.  They were left raw.  There shouldn’t be a lot of strain on them once they are tied around the little fellow’s neck.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Since the plaid had green in it, too, florist wire was used to create a band for the earmuffs.  (I saw this done on a snowman in a store and thought it was so clever!  However, they had used some black wire.  The florist wire seemed perfect for this project.)

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

His eyes were painted with regular acrylic craft paint.  Since they were supposed to look like coal, they were painted black.  Of course, his carrot nose was painted orange.  Red paint, to match the plaid fabric, was used for the mittens and the earmuffs.  And, he now looks more like a snowman, doesn’t he?

 

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A big crooked smile was painted on his face.  White twinkles were painted on his ‘coal’ eyes and white snowflakes brighten up his red mittens.

Frosty was looking a little too bright and new.  A waterbased antiquing medium by FokArt was used to take off the new look.  The antiquing medium was watered down with a wet brush and applied to the snowman in sections.  Then, the surface was quickly rubbed with a paper towel and most of the antiquing medium was removed.  It looks subtle but that is a good thing!

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After the antiquing was dry, it was time to add some sparkle to Frosty!  A light coat of Mod Podge was brushed on, a section at a time, as glue and then clear glitter was sprinkled over the wet Mod Podge.

I have to tell you right now, looking at this little snowman really puts a smile on my face.

Next, using the Loctite Super Glue, the ends of his coiled band for the earmuffs were glued into the little holes made earlier.

The plaid scarf was the finishing touch.  I love this little snowman!  Another two are in various stages of becoming snowmen, too.  

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How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume – Part 2

How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume – Part 2

Halo Costume Details

We continue on to Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume.  If you look at the inspiration picture of Master Chief, you will see the thigh pads are relatively simple in design.  Aidan needed to be here for this step.  He stood as I wrapped a large sheet of paper around his thigh and drew where the thigh pad should be.

Then, I cut out that pattern, placed it back on his leg and we decided where it needed to be adjusted.  Using a marker, I made those adjustments and cut off any excess.  The pattern was transferred onto the gray mat twice, one for each leg.  The detail was added with a ballpoint pen.  The detail would ultimately be intensified with the heat knife.  If I had more time, I would like to add some more detail with raised areas like those on the breastplate. Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The thigh guards were cut from the mat.  The heat gun was used again, like before, and the guards were shaped to fit around the thigh nicely.  Velcro will be applied to these after they have been painted.

If you use the tracing paper, trace two, the pencil tends to tear it.  It was no big deal, but a little annoying, I still ended up with a sharp design.  I did use the little ruler on the straight lines.

 

 

In retrospect, I wish I had rounded out the back edge more.

 

 

The Forearm Gauntlets

The pattern for this was easily created by measuring the length needed, cutting a large sheet of paper that length, wrapping it around Aidan’s forearm, and marking it with a felt marker.  The paper was folded in half so each side was identical.   Then, using that as the base shape, a little bit of a point was created in the middle front side.  (You can draw the detail on one side, hold the paper up to a window, and trace to the other side.)

You can see in the picture, a curved line was drawn on the upper end of the pattern and another shape in the middle just above the point.

Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

In my rush to complete this project or mindless stupor at the moment, I started cutting out the detail on the forearm piece.   Three-quarters of the way through, I realized it.  The top side was still attached.

Brainstorming, I came up with the idea of leaving that side attached and cutting the other three sides on both of the forearm pieces.  What you do to one, you have to match on the other.

I knew that the cut foam piece would pull away from the surrounding area, leaving a larger opening. It is even more apparent in the picture above.   So, matching the two made it look intentional.  (Only you know my secret.)

The Master Chief  Shoulder Pads

The template for this, Template by EVAkura :) (this template may be shared, but please give credit)  and the detailed instructions can be found here ►405th.com. 

The template is sized for an adult.  After printing it, I placed the paper on Aidan’s shoulder and marked what size would look more proportionate for him.  You can do a lot of figuring and size that down to create a size-appropriate template for yourself.  Yes, but I used a quicker solution by using PicMonkey, a photo editing tool.

Let me try to explain my madness…

First, download the template by EVAkura to your computer.  Print it out and measure how big you want it to fit your child or whomever.  I used the letters at the top and knew I wanted it to reach the right side of the ‘W’.

Then, go to PicMonkey.com.  Click on “Edit” or “Edit a Photo”.   Select the EVAkura template file from your computer.  The red arrow on the picture is the length I wanted the template to be.

Now, click on Overlays on the left side of the screen.  Then click on My Computer when it drops down.  Now, select the same template file.

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The second template will come up on top of the first template as an overlay.  Using your cursor, pull the right corner down at an angle until the end of the shoulder pad template is at the point you marked earlier.  Now, it should be the right size.  You can print it at this point, or…

Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

you can block out the print around it by adding another overlay over top of it.  Just click on Overlays.  Choose the Geometric rectangle and then change the color to white by clicking on the eyedropper and copying the white background.

Repeat the process to add another overlay horizontally across the top.  Then, save the file to your computer and print the template on card stock.  Now, transfer to the EVA foam.Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

I used tracing paper to transfer the design.  My ‘old school‘ graphic art school training showed up again. 

If you use the tracing paper, trace two, the pencil tends to tear it.  It was no big deal, but a little annoying, I still ended up with a sharp design.  I did use the little ruler on the straight lines.

A much easier option is to print the pattern on card stock, cut the pattern, trace around it, cut and remove the inner pieces a piece at a time, and trace around those.  (Much easier!)Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comCut out the shoulder pad with scissors and, or, the X-Acto knife.  The lines were traced with a ballpoint pen.  Press firmly with the pen.  Faint lines may disappear when using the heat gun and manipulate the foam to shape it.

 

 

 

Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Use the heat gun and your hands to pull and stretch the foam to shape it.  Do this before cutting out the inner pieces!  Great instructions for this can be found here ►405th.com. 

The next step was to cut out the pieces.  You need a very sharp blade to do this or you will have a lot of tattering.  You don’t have to change blades constantly.  You can sharpen the blade with a knife sharpener and sharpen it frequently.

The shapes need to be cut carefully with the X-Acto knife.  If it becomes difficult, sharpen the blade.  Caution – you have to hold the piece in your hand as you cut it.  Be careful where your fingers are in respect to the knife blade!

The pieces are then glued back in the openings.  The two rectangular pieces were recessed slightly and the rest of the pieces were raised slightly.  (Check out this post for detailed instructions ►405th.com.)    You want to apply the glue to the openings, not the pieces.  I used the LocTite Go2Glue for this.  As you slip the piece down into the opening the glue will be pushed down not up on the outside of the finished piece.Part 2 of How To Make A Halo Master Chief Costume on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

After gluing these pieces on for awhile, I came up with a technique.  I applied the Go2Glue along most of the edges, leaving a spot on the corners or ends to dab just a little bit of "Super Glue".  Then, when the piece was placed where it needed to be, the "Super Glue" would hold it in place until the Go2Glue dried. 

In the 405th post, the long rectangular detail was removed, but this piece being downsized, I felt would be too risky with the pieces being too thin.  The outer edge detail was left off for this smaller version.  Before painting, the detail was burned with the heat knife instead of cutting and recessing.

You can find part 1 ◄here.   Come back for the final details, Part 3.

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How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

 

Part 2 – The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

So, I decided to use the cable for the ‘skeleton’, the arms, hands,and shoulders, for this figure.  It’s pliable to begin with, and by the time all of the paper is glued to it, it will be stiffened.  (If he were going to be standing, a more stable frame would probably be necessary.) In  the picture below, you can already see how the arm on the left is becoming more rigid.   The newspaper page I used on the arms is a little heavier than your run of the mill newspaper.

I cut a cable long enough to allow for shoulders and the two arms.  Although I was planning to use PVC pipe for the shoulders, I had a heavy cardboard tube from a package of aluminum foil and decided to use it.   You can see the cable is  crimped up on each side of the tube, which helps hold the tube in place.  I also flattened the cardboard tube in the middle so the pumpkin head could sit on top of it.  (That would have been a lot harder to do with a PVC pipe.)

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You can see how the ends of the cable coating were sliced, splayed, and the wire ends exposed.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, the ends were spread around the ‘arm’ above the wrist and hand and using masking tape, secured the cable to the wrist and hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

My plan was to have the hands positioned like they were pulling the figure up and out of the frame on the bottom of the frame.  Trying to think how I would pull myself out of a frame, I moved his right hand to the bottom and then the left hand to the top corner of the frame.  Then, I saw a picture where the figure was offering one hand, beckoning you to come with him.  Ohhh!  That was perfect!  Now, he will look like he is reaching down and offering a hand to pull you into the frame!

So, I placed the shoulders and arms into the frame.  The piece fits perfectly against the sides of the inner frame walls.  Using eye screws, I can secure the arms to the sides of the frame.

The pumpkin head laid on top of the flattened cardboard tube looked great.  The head will be attached with fishing line or metal wire.  Two little holes drilled into the back will allow the wire to go through one and out the other and attached to eye screws in the frame.  To spread out the load on the wire or line, the wire will be run through an old marker tube.  Then, there will be less stress on the two points where the wire or line touch the pumpkin head.

The space below seemed to need something.  I picked up the sign from the skeleton wreath and placed it there.  Yes, I think a sign there would be perfect.  Now, I need to come up with the perfect words…  Any ideas?

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

In the meantime, the arms, hands, and shoulders will be receiving more Papier mâché and, ultimately, paper clay.  

Click here to see ►Part 1 of How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget.

 

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How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

This is not your typical Halloween ‘Pumpkin Wreath’!  Remember the Skeleton Wreath I made a couple of years ago?  How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWell, I decided to update the decoration, disassemble the skeleton wreath, and the idea of a pumpkin wreath began to take shape in my mind using the black frame again.

James Whitcomb Riley, the Indiana Poet,  and his Little Orphant Annie poem was my inspiration.  My mother read this to us when my siblings and I were little, and believe it, or not, I memorized it.  It is probably my favorite poem of all time, especially the part about the little boy who wouldn’t say his prayers.

No, I didn’t want a sweet little pumpkin wreath.  From Riley’s poem:

An’ the Gobble-uns’ll git you
Ef you
Don’t
Watch
Out!

The vision I had was a creepy pumpkin crawling out of the frame.  That is why I have been making Papier mâché pumpkins.  They were the practice leading up to this ‘Pumpkin Wreath’.  (You can find the instructions for the Papier mâché pumpkins by clicking on the link.)

After making these pumpkins, I can tell  you it is a fun process and I am afraid this Papier mâché has become an obsession…an addiction…  I love it!  There will be more Papier mâché creations!  

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Well, here are some of the elements to begin this wreath.  The pumpkin head has a first layer of paper clay in this picture.  The pumpkin also has a flat back because of the plan to place him in the picture frame.  I also made the hole in the back instead of the bottom.  Hopefully, that was a good decision.

This creepy cloth was found at the craft store.  Wanting some type of pliable wire to create a skeleton for the hands, I asked Dave if we had any coaxial cable (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

It took no time for him to bring this to me.  He even offered to strip the cable, which would have left me with three individual wires but why not use the whole thing?

First, using my hand as a guide and adding length to it for a bigger hand, I cut the cable for the thumb and each of the fingers.How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Then, I cut a double of each of those lengths.  The small finger ended up being 11″, the ring finger  11 -1/2″, the middle finger 13 – 1/4″,  the forefinger 11 – 3/4″, and the thumb – 10″.  These measurements are not critical!  This is a monster!  Use your imagination and create your own!

Lay the cable out with the thumb on one side, the forefinger length next to it, the middle finger, the ring finger, and lastly the little finger section.                                                                  

Gather the cable up, adjust the cable, trying to keep the fingers in the correct position, and wrap masking tape around the “wrist”.  Begin spreading the cable out to resemble the hand.  I kept referring to my own hand to judge where the hand needed to flare and where the thumb would need to be.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You might have seen where other people have used old marker tubes to create the segments of the fingers, which was my original plan, but this cable was thick enough that I didn’t feel like I needed that after all.  I kind of like it being long and skinny.

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

You can see where the thumb was positioned out and away from the forefinger piece and masking tape was wrapped around it.  It is beginning to look like a hand isn’t it? 

The next step was to wrap the entire hand piece with the masking tape.   The tape was used to create the palm and back of the hand.  Small pieces of tape were torn and placed over the ends of the fingers and then each of the fingers was wrapped.  Paper strips and clay will add more detail to the hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

These hands will look like they are pulling the pumpkin figure up and out of the black frame.  At least that is the plan!   You can see I’ve already begun to shape the hands in appropriate positions.  Even though they are easily manipulated right now, after the Papier mâché clay is applied, they won’t be as pliable.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Figuring out the arms and shoulders and adding the Papier mâché will be the next steps.  Part 2 of “How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget” will be shared later this week.

Has this inspired you to create your own pumpkin wreath?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude

DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude

DIY Cat Costume For Girls!  This is going to make an adorable, fashion-forward costume for Sophia, my granddaughter!  A picture from an ad for Target in an old magazine inspired Sophia’s costume this year.  We both started brainstorming as soon as I showed it to her.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Cat Costume Plan

Yes, she wants bracelets and we have plans to make some to match!  I think the little plain black choker necklace we made earlier will be perfect to go with this outfit!

Tiffany, who is a hair stylist, and Sophia will figure out the hairstyle and do her nails in perfect feline fashion for Halloween night!

 At first, she said she wanted to be a black panther but a golden leopard print would definitely enhance her coloring.  From my fabric stash, I retrieved some leopard print fabric leftover from an evening dress I made for Sophia’s mother when she was in high school!  As soon as she saw it, she grabbed it and started feeling the soft fabric and the black panther idea was history.  (She is a sucker for soft fabrics!)DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

A trip to the fabric stores left me a little disappointed.  I couldn’t find the same fabric, which looked richer and had more of a nap to it, but I did find a leopard print.  There was very little left on the bolt and I grabbed it while I could.  You can see a difference in the picture below.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comDIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

McCall’s pattern M7492 seemed to be a perfect pattern for this little costume.  Sophia really liked the arm gauntlet and wants the sleeveless dress.

The dress is going to be made from the newly purchased fabric but the ears will be made from the fabric scrap we already had.  It’s a little more plush and Sophia wants to use it.  What do you think?  Black velvet for the inside of the ears?

We also bought a couple of boas for the tail and maybe we will sew some around the neckline and along the hemline. (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through these links at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website.) 

DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

At first I had planned to buy black boas but Sophia and I spotted these with brown coloring online and thought they would be perfect and yes they are!

 

Only 3 pattern pieces are needed for the little dress and 1 pattern piece for the arm gauntlet.  It took no time to lay out the fabric and cut out the pattern.  There are no facings.  The arm hole and neckline edges are folded back and stitched.  How easy is that?   

It would be easy to substitute a different simple A-line dress pattern to create a similar look.

DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This little dress went together quickly in one afternoon!  The pattern calls for a knit fabric, and with that extra stretch,making the narrow hem was easy on the neckline, the armholes, and the bottom of the skirt.  The arm gauntlets were really easy to make, too.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Now, I’m waiting for Sophia to drop by, try on the dress to make sure it fits, and decide whether to add the boa around the neckline and around the hem. DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude update coming Monday…

Click here ► for more costume ideas.  Click here ► for DIY Cat Costume Details – Part 2

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