How To Make A Snowman You’ll Love

How To Make A Snowman You’ll Love

Want to make a snowman you’ll love?  Making these Papier-mâché Snowmen is so much fun!  This is the third snowman I’ve created using the same Papier-mâché used for the pumpkins earlier this year.  Creating those was so much fun, too!  What can I make for spring?  Hmmm…

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How to make a snowman?  This little snowman, (With his hat, he stands 12″ high.), was made in the same way the other snowman and the lady snowman were made, using a newspaper sleeve and crumpled newspaper.  A warning here, after you make a snowman, making these can become addictive!

You may think that I had a vision when each of these was started but that is not really the case.  For Frosty, I knew he would be wearing the earmuffs.  For Ellie, (It just seemed an appropriate name for her.), the Lady Snowman, I knew she would be wearing a red hat.  The last snowman, Archie Frost, (My friend, Cyndi, named him!) would be wearing a top hat.

 

Beyond that, they just began to take shape as the clay was applied and the arms were shaped.  Archie reminded me of a dancing snowman at first.  The way his arms happened to be positioned, it just seemed right. 

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Then, a little bird perched on his hand came to mind, and there you go.  Perfect!

 

For complete instructions on how to make a snowman, click here ►How to Make A Papier Mache Snowman from the beginning.

After he was completely dry, he was painted white, antiqued, and clear glitter was applied just like the other two before him.  He looks adorable just like this, but wouldn’t he just be perfect with a top hat?

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Instructions On How To Make A Top Hat

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To make this hat, I actually used the same brim pattern I cut out of an advertisement for the Lady Snowman’s hat.  Ellie and Archie had heads that were about the same diameter.  The hat I envisioned was a little wider at the top than it was at the base.  So, I cut a piece of newspaper, which would fit the inner circle of the hat brim.  Then, I sliced the top of the crown pattern, as you can see in the picture, to open it up a little.  You can see that making your own pattern is pretty simple.

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Using that piece as a pattern, and leaving those spaces open, I traced it on another piece of newspaper.  Then, it was folded in half, pinned to a piece of folded black felt, and cut out.  You can see the brim was cut, too, but a little width was added to the brim.  

Not shown in the picture, but also necessary, is a 4″ circle of black felt, (or whatever size fits your crown), for the top of the hat.How To Make A Snowman You'll Love on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The piece for the crown was folded in half and a 1/8″ seam was stitched on the loose edge, which would be the back seam.

 

 

 

 

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Fold the brim in half and mark the fold with straight pins.  Fold the brim in the opposite direction and mark these folds.

Divide the crown into quarters in the same way.  Then, match up the pins and pin the two pieces together, adding more pins to secure the pieces.How To Make A Snowman You'll Love on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Sew around the pinned opening, 1/8″ from the edge.How To Make A Snowman You'll Love on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

A four-inch circle was cut for the top of the hat.  The top edge of the crown and the circle were divided into fourths with the straight pins and that edge was sewn in a 1/8″ seam.  

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Clip the threads and turn it right side out and you have a hat!  How simple is that?

A piece of red velvet ribbon was attached by using a tiny dab of Tacky Glue in the front, on the right side, the back, and on the loose ends on the left side.  A little sprig of holly was glued where the two ends came together.How To Make A Snowman You'll Love on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

I think this is my favorite so far!  Each has his own personality!

How to make a snowman you’ll LOVE?  It’s really easy!  Hope this inspires you to make one of your own.  Another newspaper sleeve with crumpled paper stuffed inside with a wadded up ball of paper for a head sits beside me right now.  Yes, a collection begins.

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How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine Cone Wreath

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine Cone Wreath

A beautiful, delicate, pine cone wreath caught my attention on Pinterest.  Attached to ribbons, the pine cones were delicately suspended from the wreath.  I had never seen this done before and felt I needed to make one of these.  The pine cone wreath on Pinterest was more natural and woodsy, however, the wreath in my vision had beautiful shiny silver pine cones.

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At first, the plan was to buy another grapevine wreath as the base, but when I went to the basement storage room, the DIY Christmas wreath I made a couple of years ago caught my eye.

Wouldn’t those silver pinecones look great with the sprigs of greenery and the little red berries?  The tiny silvery leaves would echo the silver!  So, there was the plan in a matter of seconds.

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How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

All of the flowers and the ribbon bow were removed from the wreath.  There was basically a blank canvas.  Although the wreath previously had a coat of theDeluxe Snow Spray’, a few more light coats were sprayed over the front and sides of the wreath. 

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Next, the pinecones had to be spray painted silver.  The cinnamon scented pinecones were purchased at JoAnn Fabric and Craft store for half price.   They don’t have to be scented.  That was just a bonus!  A search for that ‘mirror’ spray paint at several of the craft stores was fruitless.  I settled for shiny silver spray paint, which ran about $3.oo.  (I read a review on the mirror paint and the lady wrote that it was just an overpriced silver paint, in her opinion, anyway.)

The pinecones were just placed in a shallow cardboard box and several light coats of the silver paint were sprayed over them, allowing them to dry between coats.  I didn’t get obsessive over this.  Some of the areas at the base of the pinecone petals were not covered, which was not a big deal.  The pinecones had a nice silver shine to them.

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Using a drill and the smallest drill bit I have, a tiny hole was drilled in the top of the pinecone.  Some of the stems had to be removed before the surface was flat enough to be able to drill.  I just used the needle nose pliers to break the stem off to make it easier for drilling.  The hole makes it much easier to start the eye screw. 

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 The space where the stem was in these pinecones was limited.  It was necessary to remove a few of the petals around the stem on a couple of the cones.  My fingers would not fit to screw in the eye screw on several of them.  I could get them started but ended up using the needle nose pliers to finish the job.

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The red ribbon is such a bright contrast to these silver pine cones!  I love it!  

Not sure how long I wanted the ribbons at first, a ribbon end was threaded through the eye screw and tied in a knot.  The wreath was hung on the closet door so the ribbon lengths could be determined.  The ribbon was draped through the wreath and allowed to hang down, while the other end was held and manipulated until a decision was made on the length of the longest one.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

  

 

Then, the ribbon was cut and another pine cone was attached to the loose end.  (I already liked this pine cone wreath at this point!)

 

That process was used to decide how long each length of ribbon, with pine cones attached, needed to be.

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Once I was happy with the positioning of the pine cones on the ribbon, the tiny silver spray with the red berries was wired to the bottom half of the wreath.

Then, a bow from red ribbon was made.  I stood back and looked at it and decided that bow that was removed from the original wreath was really perfect for this wreath, too!  

Once it was attached to the wreath, there was still something lacking.  The top half looked plain.  It needed something delicate to balance what was going on at the bottom of the wreath.  After scouring the craft stores, fabric stores, department stores, etc., nothing seemed quite right.  The unfinished wreath sat here for a week. 

Then, I went to Michael’s and they had all of their tiny ornaments on sale – 70% off the regular price!  There were little boxes of 1″ diameter silver ornaments and I could envision them on the wreath as the perfect subtle finishing touch.  They set me back $1.80!

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To attach them to the wreath, instead of using hangers, a piece of wire was cut and shaped into a ‘U’ resembling a hairpin.   Then, the wire was slipped through the hanger on top of the ornament and twisted to hold it securely.  The two loose wires were then twisted around the branches on the wreath so they would hold more securely.

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The wreath was hung in the dining room.  Although this pine cone wreath has a pop of red, it really seems quietly elegant, doesn’t it?

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Actually, the title of this post could have been, How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine cone Wreath For Next To Nothing!

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The Daring Elf On The Shelf’s Explosive Arrival This Year

The Daring Elf On The Shelf’s Explosive Arrival This Year

Elf On The Shelf’s Arrivals

Our ‘Elf On The Shelf’, referred to as “Jingles” has been a tradition for a few years now.  Sophia, Aidan, and their parents stayed with us for awhile when they were young.  They were here for Christmas and I bought Jingles for them.  Sophia and Aidan are growing up so quickly.  I wanted to make Jingles’ appearance this year special.  In the past, Jingles has appeared at the front door in a postal package…The Daring Elf On The Shelf's Explosive Arrival This Year on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

riding up on a Remote Controlled Truck in the garage…

The Daring Elf On The Shelf's Explosive Arrival This Year on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

perched on a swing dangling from the rails on the catwalk and holding a sign, “Let the Elf games begin!”, to name a few.  For more of our elf’s antics click here ►Jingles.

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The Daring Elf On The Shelf’s Explosive Arrival This Year 

But this year, I wanted to make it something much more memorable.  Fireworks came to mind.  My first thought was having him come out of the fireplace where a small firework, smoke bomb, or something would be set off.  Okay, that vision was quickly nixed because it would be pretty dangerous and stupid.  I didn’t want to destroy the house in the process.

The thought of Jingles dangling from a parachute in the maple tree in the backyard was considered, but that really didn’t mesh with the firework idea.  The idea of a loud bang to get the grandkids attention was the objective.

My husband Dave is not one to go to when you have an idea that is a little on the creative side.  He will immediately tell you why your idea won’t work.  So, I talked to my youngest son, Will, who usually is in charge of the fireworks on the fourth of July.  He was on board immediately.

He agreed the deed had to be done outside and on a flat surface.  We brainstormed for awhile and he said he would take care of it, getting the appropriate firework that is.  That turned out to be a mortar.  

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The plan was for him to set off the mortar and then, from a safe distance, throw the elf close to the mortar shell.  Positioning wasn’t critical.  Jingles had, presumably, been blown up by a mortar! 

 

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 A little charcoal colored eyeshadow was applied to the little guy’s face to look like he had been smoked.

Well, after everyone finished the Thanksgiving meal and all were preparing to play games and other activities, there was a loud boom and bright lights in the backyard.  Everyone looked around in wonder and asked what that explosion was.   We all filed out onto the deck.

Even though it was dark by this time, the kids immediately noticed the upright mortar shell in the yard.  They also noticed something right beside the shell but were not sure what it was for a few seconds.  Then, Aidan shouted,  “It’s Jingles!”

Lulu commented that his face was all black.  There were several discussions going on at this time and I thoroughly enjoyed listening.  One of those comments was, “Jingles is really naughty.”

We cautioned them to stand back for a few minutes, and then, they cautiously crept up to Jingles and shouted, “He has a letter!”

Tiffany asked if they could retrieve it without touching Jingles.   Remember, the magic will disappear if he is touched.   Aidan was successful in accomplishing the task and they all came inside to listen to Aidan read it aloud.  He untied the red ribbon wrapped around the letter and unrolled it to reveal this note.  The note was created on PicMonkey.com using the “design” icon at the top of the page.

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Well, they were a little concerned that he was outside but we assured them he could take care of himself.

When they were all preoccupied, I sneaked out to retrieve the errant elf and hid him under the front seat of my car.

The Next Morning

The kids spent the night with us and the next morning, bright and early, I got up thinking I’d rescue Jingles from the car and place him somewhere before the kids were out of bed.

That didn’t happen.  Aidan was already sitting at the kitchen table!  After he got involved in something on the iPad, I pulled Jingles from the car and hid him in my robe.

Once upstairs, I pulled him out and began to clean his face.  I noticed a dark spot on his leg and began to brush it away, thinking it was a piece of leaf.  Wrong!  Jingles had been wounded!The Daring Elf On The Shelf's Explosive Arrival This Year on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Apparently, Jon-Michael helped Will with the covert deed and laid the elf next to the mortar before it exploded.  Sparks from the fireworks landed on the elf.  That was not the plan but who knows?  It could have happened if he had been tossed there later.  I knew there were risks when this scheme was first formed in my mind.  We are lucky he didn’t catch fire and go up in smoke right in front of the kids!  That would have scarred them for life!

What to do?  Clearly, I didn’t have time to repair him at that point.  I pulled out an old sachet that looked like a tiny pillow, slipped Jingles in my umbrella cover, and placed him in front of Frosty in the foyer.  That Totes cover kind of looked like a sleeping bag, right?  Well, it hid his injuries, giving me a little more time to figure out this catastrophe!

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Sophia woke up and immediately said, “Where is Jingles?” 

In a short time, she had found him and said, “His arm is broken!”

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What?  When he was stuffed in my robe, apparently his arm was disfigured!  She showed Aidan and then began to go over what had happened the previous night.  They surmised it had happened during that explosion.

 

Well, the next time they came over, Jingles had an arm sling and two tiny Band-Aids on his burnt leg. 

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 Sophie exclaimed, “See, I told you he broke his arm!”

Not sure right now what to do to repair the little guy.  Maybe some clothes are in order.  Any suggestions?

Perhaps this was not the best idea but I don’t think the kids will ever forget The Daring Elf On The Shelf’s Explosive Arrival This Year!

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How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland

How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland

 

DIY Christmas Ornament Garland

To make your own ornament garland, you will need some wire, wire cutters, and a large washer.  Then, you will need to make a picture frame wire knot.  This knot will hold the wire securely on the washer.  (I used some 24 gauge wire that I had in my craft supplies.  You want to be sure the wire is strong enough to hold the ornaments without breaking and yet strong enough to support the ornaments.)

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To make the knot, run the wire through a washer and back alongside itself.How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Bring the wire over and around itself and back through the washer. 

 

That makes a little slipknot. The slip knot keeps it tight on the washer.

 

 

 

 

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Then, twist the wire around the base of the knot a few times.  Clip the tail off close to the wire.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Once the wire was securely attached to the washer, the washer was placed on a nail head, which has been used for attaching garland in the past.  (You can use the Command hooks for this instead.  Earlier, a couple of the clear damage-free Command hooks were strategically placed on the mantel for a place to drape the wire garland.) 

To measure how much wire was needed, the wire was draped over both of the Command hooks, looped down, back up, and across the fireplace to the other side where another small nail used for garland was positioned.   A generous amount of extra wire was added to the rough measurement and then the wire was cut.  Remember that when the ornaments are added to the wire, there will be added bulk and that will change the length of wire needed to drape nicely.

Then, I began to string red, white, gold, and silver ball ornaments on the wire.  Red was the intentional predominant color.  We have a variety of red ornaments in different textures.  There are red and white satin balls we bought in 1978!  There are a variety of plastic ball ornaments, which were purchased at end of the season sales over the years.  We also have some glass ornaments but I chose not to use them on this garland, fearing they might break.  Two more canisters of shatterproof red plastic ornaments were purchased for this project to add to those we already had.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales from this link.  Thanks for supporting this website!)How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Don’t you just love this look?  I don’t know why we haven’t done this before!  After stringing these few and placing the strand on the mantel, stepping back, I was just struck by the beauty of it.

 

Anyway, for each shiny red plastic ball I used on the first side, I set aside a matching one for the other side.  For each glittered red ball, one was set aside for the other side, etc.  My plan was to duplicate the pattern in reverse on the other end.  I didn’t want one side to be visually heavier than the other.  (It probably would have been just fine if I hadn’t done this.  Lol!)  In retrospect, maybe I should have started in the middle and worked on both sides at the same time.  Oh, well!

 

A few of the balls popped off of the end How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comcap due to stress on them being bunched together.  This is not a problem.  Just use some Tacky glue to apply liberally to the opening of the ball, click it back on the cap and allow it to dry.  If you pick it back up before it is completely dry, it might pop off again, ahem, not that I did that.

Remember to leave some slack in the wire so that the washers, on the end, and the Command hooks can easily be reached with the wire.  If the balls are packed on too tightly, it will be impossible to loop on the hooks or nails.

The measurement of the fireplace where the ornament garland is placed is 72″ wide.  The final length of the ornament garland is 8 – 1/2 feet.

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In order to make placement a little easier, I measured, and with a ribbon, marked where the garland wire should drape over the hooks.  You could also use another piece of wire to wrap around the garland wire and secure to the hooks if you happen to pack the balls on too tightly.  There is always a way over, under, around, or through, right?

Although I had not planned to, the Papier- Mâché Lady Snowman and the Papier- Mâché Snowman are on the fireplace mantel.  I picked up the letter ‘J’, the letter ‘Y’, and the big red jingle bell at Hobby Lobby earlier this season.  I had a vision of what the mantel would look like but after seeing the Snowmen with the letters, I changed my mind!  The original snowman will ultimately be featured on the table in the foyer.  I’m working on another one with a hat to take his place on the fireplace mantel.  How To Easily Make Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Alright!  I LOVE this Beautiful Christmas Ornament Garland!  The picture does not do it justice.  It is so simple to make!  Can you imagine this in your favorite color combination?  The possibilities are endless!  What do you think?

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How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman – Part 2

Part 2 – How To Make A Papier- Mâché Snowman

After the little Papier-Mâché snowman from Part 1 was dry, I realized his feet weren’t so steady.  I had used the cream cheese box to cut out and make soles for his feet.  That cardboard was not so firm and somehow the ends of his feet curled in the front.  As you can imagine, that created a bit of a wobbly snowman.  Extra paper clay had to be applied there and flattened to make him a little more stable, which meant more drying time.  Sigh…

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To remedy this, on the second snowman, a pizza box lid was used to create soles for feet.  Let me tell you that this was a far better idea.   After stuffing the newspaper sleeve, applying the paper strips and allowing that to dry, I glued the pizza box lid soles in the appropriate spots and allowed the Tacky glue to dry.

Then, the paper clay was used to fill in the space around the bottom, creating a nice base.  Paper clay was also applied in a ring around the neck.  The clay was allowed to dry.  This helped to stabilize the head and the base.  I think I will start doing this with all of the snowmen!

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

After the clay had completely dried, a coat of white primer and paint was applied.  I really liked the paint used on the pumpkins as a base but that particular paint does not come in white.  This Olympic primer and paint in one works really nicely, too.

He’s beginning to look more like a snowman now and less like an alien or a troll!  Lol!

 

Remember the Easy DIY Melted Snowman Tablescape from last year?  I had some of the fabric left from the flannel plaid scarf.  This was used to create a little scarf for this first snowman.  The snowman stands about 10″ tall.  The scarf measures 18″ long and ended up being 1 – 7/8″ wide.  The lines of the plaid were followed as a guide to cut straight lines.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Threads were removed from both ends to create fringe.  I didn’t bother to sew up the edges.  They were left raw.  There shouldn’t be a lot of strain on them once they are tied around the little fellow’s neck.

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

Since the plaid had green in it, too, florist wire was used to create a band for the earmuffs.  (I saw this done on a snowman in a store and thought it was so clever!  However, they had used some black wire.  The florist wire seemed perfect for this project.)

 

How To Make A Papier-Mâché Snowman - Part 2

 

His eyes were painted with regular acrylic craft paint.  Since they were supposed to look like coal, they were painted black.  Of course, his carrot nose was painted orange.  Red paint, to match the plaid fabric, was used for the mittens and the earmuffs.  And, he now looks more like a snowman, doesn’t he?

 

 

 

 


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A big crooked smile was painted on his face.  White twinkles were painted on his ‘coal’ eyes and white snowflakes brighten up his red mittens.

Frosty was looking a little too bright and new.  A waterbased antiquing medium by FokArt was used to take off the new look.  The antiquing medium was watered down with a wet brush and applied to the snowman in sections.  Then, the surface was quickly rubbed with a paper towel and most of the antiquing medium was removed.  It looks subtle but that is a good thing!

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After the antiquing was dry, it was time to add some sparkle to Frosty!  A light coat of Mod Podge was brushed on, a section at a time, as glue and then clear glitter was sprinkled over the wet Mod Podge.

I have to tell you right now, looking at this little snowman really puts a smile on my face.

Next, using the Loctite Super Glue, the ends of his coiled band for the earmuffs were glued into the little holes made earlier.

The plaid scarf was the finishing touch.  I love this little snowman!  Another two are in various stages of becoming snowmen, too.  

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