How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

 

Part 2 – The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

So, I decided to use the cable for the ‘skeleton’, the arms, hands,and shoulders, for this figure.  It’s pliable to begin with, and by the time all of the paper is glued to it, it will be stiffened.  (If he were going to be standing, a more stable frame would probably be necessary.) In  the picture below, you can already see how the arm on the left is becoming more rigid.   The newspaper page I used on the arms is a little heavier than your run of the mill newspaper.

I cut a cable long enough to allow for shoulders and the two arms.  Although I was planning to use PVC pipe for the shoulders, I had a heavy cardboard tube from a package of aluminum foil and decided to use it.   You can see the cable is  crimped up on each side of the tube, which helps hold the tube in place.  I also flattened the cardboard tube in the middle so the pumpkin head could sit on top of it.  (That would have been a lot harder to do with a PVC pipe.)

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You can see how the ends of the cable coating were sliced, splayed, and the wire ends exposed.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, the ends were spread around the ‘arm’ above the wrist and hand and using masking tape, secured the cable to the wrist and hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

My plan was to have the hands positioned like they were pulling the figure up and out of the frame on the bottom of the frame.  Trying to think how I would pull myself out of a frame, I moved his right hand to the bottom and then the left hand to the top corner of the frame.  Then, I saw a picture where the figure was offering one hand, beckoning you to come with him.  Ohhh!  That was perfect!  Now, he will look like he is reaching down and offering a hand to pull you into the frame!

So, I placed the shoulders and arms into the frame.  The piece fits perfectly against the sides of the inner frame walls.  Using eye screws, I can secure the arms to the sides of the frame.

The pumpkin head laid on top of the flattened cardboard tube looked great.  The head will be attached with fishing line or metal wire.  Two little holes drilled into the back will allow the wire to go through one and out the other and attached to eye screws in the frame.  To spread out the load on the wire or line, the wire will be run through an old marker tube.  Then, there will be less stress on the two points where the wire or line touch the pumpkin head.

The space below seemed to need something.  I picked up the sign from the skeleton wreath and placed it there.  Yes, I think a sign there would be perfect.  Now, I need to come up with the perfect words…  Any ideas?

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

In the meantime, the arms, hands, and shoulders will be receiving more Papier mâché and, ultimately, paper clay.  

Click here to see ►Part 1 of How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget.

 

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How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

This is not your typical Halloween ‘Pumpkin Wreath’!  Remember the Skeleton Wreath I made a couple of years ago?  How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWell, I decided to update the decoration, disassemble the skeleton wreath, and the idea of a pumpkin wreath began to take shape in my mind using the black frame again.

James Whitcomb Riley, the Indiana Poet,  and his Little Orphant Annie poem was my inspiration.  My mother read this to us when my siblings and I were little, and believe it, or not, I memorized it.  It is probably my favorite poem of all time, especially the part about the little boy who wouldn’t say his prayers.

No, I didn’t want a sweet little pumpkin wreath.  From Riley’s poem:

An’ the Gobble-uns’ll git you
Ef you
Don’t
Watch
Out!

The vision I had was a creepy pumpkin crawling out of the frame.  That is why I have been making Papier mâché pumpkins.  They were the practice leading up to this ‘Pumpkin Wreath’.  (You can find the instructions for the Papier mâché pumpkins by clicking on the link.)

After making these pumpkins, I can tell  you it is a fun process and I am afraid this Papier mâché has become an obsession…an addiction…  I love it!  There will be more Papier mâché creations!  

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Well, here are some of the elements to begin this wreath.  The pumpkin head has a first layer of paper clay in this picture.  The pumpkin also has a flat back because of the plan to place him in the picture frame.  I also made the hole in the back instead of the bottom.  Hopefully, that was a good decision.

This creepy cloth was found at the craft store.  Wanting some type of pliable wire to create a skeleton for the hands, I asked Dave if we had any coaxial cable (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

It took no time for him to bring this to me.  He even offered to strip the cable, which would have left me with three individual wires but why not use the whole thing?

First, using my hand as a guide and adding length to it for a bigger hand, I cut the cable for the thumb and each of the fingers.How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Then, I cut a double of each of those lengths.  The small finger ended up being 11″, the ring finger  11 -1/2″, the middle finger 13 – 1/4″,  the forefinger 11 – 3/4″, and the thumb – 10″.  These measurements are not critical!  This is a monster!  Use your imagination and create your own!

Lay the cable out with the thumb on one side, the forefinger length next to it, the middle finger, the ring finger, and lastly the little finger section.                                                                  

Gather the cable up, adjust the cable, trying to keep the fingers in the correct position, and wrap masking tape around the “wrist”.  Begin spreading the cable out to resemble the hand.  I kept referring to my own hand to judge where the hand needed to flare and where the thumb would need to be.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You might have seen where other people have used old marker tubes to create the segments of the fingers, which was my original plan, but this cable was thick enough that I didn’t feel like I needed that after all.  I kind of like it being long and skinny.

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

You can see where the thumb was positioned out and away from the forefinger piece and masking tape was wrapped around it.  It is beginning to look like a hand isn’t it? 

The next step was to wrap the entire hand piece with the masking tape.   The tape was used to create the palm and back of the hand.  Small pieces of tape were torn and placed over the ends of the fingers and then each of the fingers was wrapped.  Paper strips and clay will add more detail to the hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

These hands will look like they are pulling the pumpkin figure up and out of the black frame.  At least that is the plan!   You can see I’ve already begun to shape the hands in appropriate positions.  Even though they are easily manipulated right now, after the Papier mâché clay is applied, they won’t be as pliable.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Figuring out the arms and shoulders and adding the Papier mâché will be the next steps.  Part 2 of “How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget” will be shared later this week.

Has this inspired you to create your own pumpkin wreath?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume

Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume

Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume –

For Girls With Attitude – Part 2

Sophia came by and tried on the cat costume dress before we added the ‘Cat Costume Details’.  It was a perfect fit, fortunately.  We did take her measurements and matched them to a size 10 and that’s what we made.

She pranced all around the house in it.  Clearly, she likes it.Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2  on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

While she was wearing it, we pinned on the boa ‘tail’.  We were thinking of adding the boa to the hemline, too.  That was too much and distracted from the tail.  We ended up deciding to sew the boa around the neckline only.  The boa placed right on the hem of the neckline, I felt, was a little too close to her face.  We decided to sew it 5/8″ from the edge of the neckline.  It was a minor adjustment but we felt it was warranted.

I bought two of these boas and because we decided against using it for the hemline, the second wasn’t necessary.  Sometimes you just need to recognize when too much is too much and let it go.  This was one of those cases.

Cat Costume Details

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The Tail

The Boa is so light that no reinforcement had to be added to the dress.  I simply hand stitched the boa  through the fabric and through the seam allowance in the middle of the back of the dress.  A few stitches through the added bulk of the seam allowance was enough to secure and support the lightweight boa.

Then, Sophia told me how she wanted the ears.  She did not want them on a headband.  She wanted them on hair clips.  She remembered Emily’s fox costume from last year and wanted them to look similar to hers.

I showed her the fabric and tried to fashion an ear shape and explained I had planned to use black panne velour for the inside of the ear.  She wanted some wispy fur, too.  (This child has a creative mind!)

Grabbing a piece of the boa, I placed it on the leopard print ear shape around the outer edge.  She said, “Yes!”

I am not sure how to affix it to where it should go!  Lol!  Working on this…

How To Make Cat Ears

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

First of all, you need to cut two ear shapes from each, the leopard print fabric, the lining fabric, and the fusible fabric interfacing.  ‘I added the Pellon, or fabric interfacing, thinking it would stiffen the ears a little and keep them more upright.

 

 

 

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comIron the fusible (‘Pellon’, as I am used to calling it, which is the brand I have used forever, now synonymous with interfacing!) interfacing to the worn side of the leopard print fabric. 

 

Stack the ear shape print fabric with the fusible webbing on top of the black facing fabric, right sides together.

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Stitch 1/4″ from the outer edges, leaving an opening at the bottom for turning.

 

 

 

Turn the ear shape right side out now.  Stitch the opening closed along the bottom edge with a needle and thread.  When I stitched the bottom edge, I took a little pleat in the middle of the black lining fabric and pinned it before sewing the edge.  It helped the panther fabric roll around the edge better.  I did not iron this.  It wasn’t necessary.

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You will also need to attach the ears to some type of hair clips or a headband.  Sophia did not want a headband.  Yes, I think it would have been easier to do that! 

I bought these hair clips and attached one to the ear.  It just was not working the way I had envisioned.  If I had made the ears smaller, it probably would have worked better.  Plan B is necessary.

What is plan B?  Why, asking my daughter, Tiffany, the hair stylist, of course!  She is sure to have an idea of what will work the best!

Update:  We asked Tiffany and she suggested we make three loops. using thread, along the bottom of the ear where hairpins could be attached.  That is what we did.  Each loop was made of multiple threads large enough for the plastic coated ends to slip through easily.  She said she could tease her hair up a little to help support them if necessary.Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Arm Gauntlets

The arm gauntlets, on the other hand, were too small.  The size 10 was too tight to even get over her hand!  They were too tight for me but I thought her hands were smaller.  Well, they are not.  Our hands are almost the same size!  This child is not going to be height impaired like her Grammy!Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The reason for this is simple.  The fabric we purchased was a knit but it did not have as much stretch as some knits.  If we had used a panne velour, it would not have been a problem.  If you’re making these, keep that in mind.  Use a knit with plenty of stretch.  I ended up making the size 14 pattern for these and only taking a 1/4″ seam in those.

Finishing up the ears, buying some black tights, boots, and shopping for the cat eye sunglasses will be the next step.  I’ve got to show Sophia these glasses from Amazon, which look perfect!  (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sale at no cost to you if you purchase through this link.  Thank you for supporting this website.)Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Update:  The glasses are in and they are purr-fect!  They even came with a little fabric bag!

Click here for ►Part 1 – DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude! 

We are well ahead of schedule for Sophia’s Halloween costume but Aidan’s outfit is going to be much more involved, Master Chief (Halo)…  That is a challenge!

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

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Designer Envelopes – Easy DIY

Designer Envelopes – Easy DIY

These Designer Envelopes are an Easy DIY!  I seriously cannot believe how quick and easy it is to make envelopes with this little gizmo!  Have you seen this little envelope punch board in the craft stores?  Well, I had not and when I saw it, I had to buy it!   (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Don’t you just love tiny envelopes?  They can hold so many things, little notes for the kid’s lunch boxes, coins, a lock of hair for a memory book, a homemade Valentine, or some seeds for someone special.  

My idea is to make tiny envelopes for our ‘Christmas Game’.   ◄(Scroll down on this page to see some of the cards I’ve made in past years.)  Each year, I buy a bunch of items and make cheesy little gift cards to go with the gifts.  This year, I think the cards will be attached to the top of the gift and the family can read the cards out loud before opening the gifts.Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Have you ever messed up the envelope for a birthday card, anniversary card, or whatever and had no backup replacement?  This is the solution!  The chart on the front gives the measurements for an envelope for up to a 6″ x 8-1/2″ card!  The smallest is for a 2″ x 3-1/2″ card!

Not only does the punch board make one size of envelope, it makes lots of sizes!  Emily and I had so much fun making her ‘Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gifts and Boxes‘ using a similar punch board for the boxes.  They turned out so cute!Will You Be My Bridesmaid Gift on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The envelope punch creates fold tabs on one side and on the other side of the punch, it rounds the corners.  On the front of the punch board is a chart where you can match the card size you have, the size of paper you need, and the 1st scoring line measurement , where you need to align your paper.  Having it right there on the face of the board is brilliant!  No need to search for paper instructions!  Not that I have ever had to do that!

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

After choosing what size envelope you need, you simply cut paper the size indicated on the chart.  You will want to do this neatly and an X-Acto Mat, an X-Acto knife, and a metal straight edge will help keep everything straight and precise.   (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Next, you need to line the paper up with the corresponding score line and press the punch down.

 

 

 

 

 

The next step is scoring the line using the scoring tool.  

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Rotate the paper 90° clockwise.Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Line up the score guide with the line you just scored.  Press down on the punch to make the fold tab and using the scoring tool, score along the score line. 

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Continue turning the paper 90° clockwise and repeating these steps until all four sides have been punched and scored.  Your paper should look like this.Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Place one of the corners in the “Reverse Punch” located on the top side of the punch board.  Press punch to create a rounded corner.  Repeat for remaining three corners.

Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Fold on the scored lines and using the scoring tool, slide the blade along the folded edge to make nice sharp folds.Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Dab a small amount of Tacky Glue along the underside of the bottom flap edges and fold over the two side flaps.  Tacky Glue is thicker than regular school glue and holds more quickly.  You only need a thin line along the edge, allowing a little room for spreading when folded and pressed together. Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Isn’t this great?  It looks perfect and this is the first envelope I made with this little jewel!

No more boring envelopes!  Now we can make Designer Envelopes for every occasion and every season!  Designer Envelopes – Easy DIY!Designer Envelopes - Easy DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make

Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make

‘Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make”  If you sew at all, these little velvet pumpkins will be easy to make and they look so pretty!  There are at least two ways to stuff them using poly fiber fill or, my favorite, using the little plastic pellets and the patterns below.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sale from these links at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

pumpkin pattern download  ►pumpkin stem pattern download

Sewing The Pumpkin

Cut 6 pumpkin pieces of one size from velvet or velour fabric.  Place two of the cut pieces, right sides together, matching the edges on one side and pinning.  Sew a 1/4″ seam leaving 3/4″ open at the top.  Trim threads.

Place another pumpkin piece, right sides together, matching an edge to one of the pieces you have just sewn together.   Pin together and sew, leaving 3/4″ open at the top.  back-stitch one or two stitches.  (This helps hold the seam together when the piece is being filled or stuffed.)

Continue sewing the remaining sections together in the same way, until all 6 sections have been sewn together.  Then, match the 2 loose edges together, pin, and sew a 1/4″ seam, being sure the bottom end is completely closed.  (You don’t want the pellets slipping out of the pumpkin!)

When all the pieces have been sewn together, you should have a shape that looks like this.

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Filling With Plastic Pellets

Turn the velvet pumpkin right side out and fill with poly fiber fill or plastic pellets.  I tried a few different ways to fill the pumpkin with these pellets, straight from the bag, using a funnel, but found the easiest and less messy way was to fill a small glass and pour into the pumpkin shape.

 

 

 

 

When your pumpkin has been filled to the top,  hand stitch the 3/4″ opening at the top of the seam and knot the thread.  Repeat for each section.  Before finishing the last section, be sure you have extra thread to sew a gathering stitch around the top, which will be used to pull the pumpkin closed.  (The easier way to do that follows.)

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Then, tie the knot, run a gathering stitch through each section, about 1/4″ from the top.  Pull that section up tight and hold with your thumb and forefinger.  Run the needle through the fabric where your gathering stitch is and pull tight.  Take a couple of stitches to securely hold this section.  Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Repeat this process until the top is completely closed.  (I figured this one out after wrestling with it for awhile!  It is much easier this way!)Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

At this point, you can glue a dried stem, or attach any stem you can dream up, but I decided to make a stem from felt for this little pellet filled pumpkin. 

 

 

 

The Stem

 I knew what I wanted the end product to look like and after a while, I came up with this hand stitched felt stem.  Embroidery floss was used to stitch the three sections together.  The seams are supposed to mimic the lines and indentations in real pumpkin stems.  Using the pattern at the top of this post, you can make your own, too.   Making the pumpkin with the plastic pellets and the felt stem, it is virtually childproof!Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The downloadable pattern explains how to sew the felt stem together.  It is then, just stitched to the top of the velvet pumpkins.  

Velvet pumpkins -How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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