Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume

Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume

Cat Costume Details – DIY Cat Costume –

For Girls With Attitude – Part 2

Sophia came by and tried on the cat costume dress before we added the ‘Cat Costume Details’.  It was a perfect fit, fortunately.  We did take her measurements and matched them to a size 10 and that’s what we made.

She pranced all around the house in it.  Clearly, she likes it.Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2  on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

While she was wearing it, we pinned on the boa ‘tail’.  We were thinking of adding the boa to the hemline, too.  That was too much and distracted from the tail.  We ended up deciding to sew the boa around the neckline only.  The boa placed right on the hem of the neckline, I felt, was a little too close to her face.  We decided to sew it 5/8″ from the edge of the neckline.  It was a minor adjustment but we felt it was warranted.

I bought two of these boas and because we decided against using it for the hemline, the second wasn’t necessary.  Sometimes you just need to recognize when too much is too much and let it go.  This was one of those cases.

Cat Costume Details

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The Tail

The Boa is so light that no reinforcement had to be added to the dress.  I simply hand stitched the boa  through the fabric and through the seam allowance in the middle of the back of the dress.  A few stitches through the added bulk of the seam allowance was enough to secure and support the lightweight boa.

Then, Sophia told me how she wanted the ears.  She did not want them on a headband.  She wanted them on hair clips.  She remembered Emily’s fox costume from last year and wanted them to look similar to hers.

I showed her the fabric and tried to fashion an ear shape and explained I had planned to use black panne velour for the inside of the ear.  She wanted some wispy fur, too.  (This child has a creative mind!)

Grabbing a piece of the boa, I placed it on the leopard print ear shape around the outer edge.  She said, “Yes!”

I am not sure how to affix it to where it should go!  Lol!  Working on this…

How To Make Cat Ears

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

First of all, you need to cut two ear shapes from each, the leopard print fabric, the lining fabric, and the fusible fabric interfacing.  ‘I added the Pellon, or fabric interfacing, thinking it would stiffen the ears a little and keep them more upright.

 

 

 

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comIron the fusible (‘Pellon’, as I am used to calling it, which is the brand I have used forever, now synonymous with interfacing!) interfacing to the worn side of the leopard print fabric. 

 

Stack the ear shape print fabric with the fusible webbing on top of the black facing fabric, right sides together.

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Stitch 1/4″ from the outer edges, leaving an opening at the bottom for turning.

 

 

 

Turn the ear shape right side out now.  Stitch the opening closed along the bottom edge with a needle and thread.  When I stitched the bottom edge, I took a little pleat in the middle of the black lining fabric and pinned it before sewing the edge.  It helped the panther fabric roll around the edge better.  I did not iron this.  It wasn’t necessary.

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You will also need to attach the ears to some type of hair clips or a headband.  Sophia did not want a headband.  Yes, I think it would have been easier to do that! 

I bought these hair clips and attached one to the ear.  It just was not working the way I had envisioned.  If I had made the ears smaller, it probably would have worked better.  Plan B is necessary.

What is plan B?  Why, asking my daughter, Tiffany, the hair stylist, of course!  She is sure to have an idea of what will work the best!

Update:  We asked Tiffany and she suggested we make three loops. using thread, along the bottom of the ear where hairpins could be attached.  That is what we did.  Each loop was made of multiple threads large enough for the plastic coated ends to slip through easily.  She said she could tease her hair up a little to help support them if necessary.Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 Arm Gauntlets

The arm gauntlets, on the other hand, were too small.  The size 10 was too tight to even get over her hand!  They were too tight for me but I thought her hands were smaller.  Well, they are not.  Our hands are almost the same size!  This child is not going to be height impaired like her Grammy!Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The reason for this is simple.  The fabric we purchased was a knit but it did not have as much stretch as some knits.  If we had used a panne velour, it would not have been a problem.  If you’re making these, keep that in mind.  Use a knit with plenty of stretch.  I ended up making the size 14 pattern for these and only taking a 1/4″ seam in those.

Finishing up the ears, buying some black tights, boots, and shopping for the cat eye sunglasses will be the next step.  I’ve got to show Sophia these glasses from Amazon, which look perfect!  (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sale at no cost to you if you purchase through this link.  Thank you for supporting this website.)Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Update:  The glasses are in and they are purr-fect!  They even came with a little fabric bag!

Click here for ►Part 1 – DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude! 

We are well ahead of schedule for Sophia’s Halloween costume but Aidan’s outfit is going to be much more involved, Master Chief (Halo)…  That is a challenge!

Cat Costume Details - DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude - Part 2 on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

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DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude

DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude

DIY Cat Costume For Girls!  This is going to make an adorable, fashion-forward costume for Sophia, my granddaughter!  A picture from an ad for Target in an old magazine inspired Sophia’s costume this year.  We both started brainstorming as soon as I showed it to her.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Cat Costume Plan

Yes, she wants bracelets and we have plans to make some to match!  I think the little plain black choker necklace we made earlier will be perfect to go with this outfit!

Tiffany, who is a hair stylist, and Sophia will figure out the hairstyle and do her nails in perfect feline fashion for Halloween night!

 At first, she said she wanted to be a black panther but a golden leopard print would definitely enhance her coloring.  From my fabric stash, I retrieved some leopard print fabric leftover from an evening dress I made for Sophia’s mother when she was in high school!  As soon as she saw it, she grabbed it and started feeling the soft fabric and the black panther idea was history.  (She is a sucker for soft fabrics!)DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

A trip to the fabric stores left me a little disappointed.  I couldn’t find the same fabric, which looked richer and had more of a nap to it, but I did find a leopard print.  There was very little left on the bolt and I grabbed it while I could.  You can see a difference in the picture below.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comDIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

McCall’s pattern M7492 seemed to be a perfect pattern for this little costume.  Sophia really liked the arm gauntlet and wants the sleeveless dress.

The dress is going to be made from the newly purchased fabric but the ears will be made from the fabric scrap we already had.  It’s a little more plush and Sophia wants to use it.  What do you think?  Black velvet for the inside of the ears?

We also bought a couple of boas for the tail and maybe we will sew some around the neckline and along the hemline. (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sales through these links at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website.) 

DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

At first I had planned to buy black boas but Sophia and I spotted these with brown coloring online and thought they would be perfect and yes they are!

 

Only 3 pattern pieces are needed for the little dress and 1 pattern piece for the arm gauntlet.  It took no time to lay out the fabric and cut out the pattern.  There are no facings.  The arm hole and neckline edges are folded back and stitched.  How easy is that?   

It would be easy to substitute a different simple A-line dress pattern to create a similar look.

DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This little dress went together quickly in one afternoon!  The pattern calls for a knit fabric, and with that extra stretch,making the narrow hem was easy on the neckline, the armholes, and the bottom of the skirt.  The arm gauntlets were really easy to make, too.DIY Cat Costume - For Girls With Attitude on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Now, I’m waiting for Sophia to drop by, try on the dress to make sure it fits, and decide whether to add the boa around the neckline and around the hem. DIY Cat Costume – For Girls With Attitude update coming Monday…

Click here ► for more costume ideas.  Click here ► for DIY Cat Costume Details – Part 2

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Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make

Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make

‘Velvet Pumpkins – How To Make”  If you sew at all, these little velvet pumpkins will be easy to make and they look so pretty!  There are at least two ways to stuff them using poly fiber fill or, my favorite, using the little plastic pellets and the patterns below.  (We are an Amazon affiliate and will receive a small percentage of any sale from these links at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

pumpkin pattern download  ►pumpkin stem pattern download

Sewing The Pumpkin

Cut 6 pumpkin pieces of one size from velvet or velour fabric.  Place two of the cut pieces, right sides together, matching the edges on one side and pinning.  Sew a 1/4″ seam leaving 3/4″ open at the top.  Trim threads.

Place another pumpkin piece, right sides together, matching an edge to one of the pieces you have just sewn together.   Pin together and sew, leaving 3/4″ open at the top.  back-stitch one or two stitches.  (This helps hold the seam together when the piece is being filled or stuffed.)

Continue sewing the remaining sections together in the same way, until all 6 sections have been sewn together.  Then, match the 2 loose edges together, pin, and sew a 1/4″ seam, being sure the bottom end is completely closed.  (You don’t want the pellets slipping out of the pumpkin!)

When all the pieces have been sewn together, you should have a shape that looks like this.

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Filling With Plastic Pellets

Turn the velvet pumpkin right side out and fill with poly fiber fill or plastic pellets.  I tried a few different ways to fill the pumpkin with these pellets, straight from the bag, using a funnel, but found the easiest and less messy way was to fill a small glass and pour into the pumpkin shape.

 

 

 

 

When your pumpkin has been filled to the top,  hand stitch the 3/4″ opening at the top of the seam and knot the thread.  Repeat for each section.  Before finishing the last section, be sure you have extra thread to sew a gathering stitch around the top, which will be used to pull the pumpkin closed.  (The easier way to do that follows.)

Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Then, tie the knot, run a gathering stitch through each section, about 1/4″ from the top.  Pull that section up tight and hold with your thumb and forefinger.  Run the needle through the fabric where your gathering stitch is and pull tight.  Take a couple of stitches to securely hold this section.  Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Repeat this process until the top is completely closed.  (I figured this one out after wrestling with it for awhile!  It is much easier this way!)Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

At this point, you can glue a dried stem, or attach any stem you can dream up, but I decided to make a stem from felt for this little pellet filled pumpkin. 

 

 

 

The Stem

 I knew what I wanted the end product to look like and after a while, I came up with this hand stitched felt stem.  Embroidery floss was used to stitch the three sections together.  The seams are supposed to mimic the lines and indentations in real pumpkin stems.  Using the pattern at the top of this post, you can make your own, too.   Making the pumpkin with the plastic pellets and the felt stem, it is virtually childproof!Velvet Pumpkins - How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The downloadable pattern explains how to sew the felt stem together.  It is then, just stitched to the top of the velvet pumpkins.  

Velvet pumpkins -How To Make on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

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‘Cosplay Batman’s Female Version of the Penguin Costume’ DIY? – Part 2

‘Cosplay Batman’s Female Version of the Penguin Costume’ DIY? – Part 2

April 28,2017

  ‘Cosplay Batman’s Female Version of the Penguin Costume’ DIY?  Yes, this is backstage at the Aveda Catwalk for Water Cincinnati event.  Ashley looked stunning in her umbrella skirt.  To her right are Sydney and my daughter, Tiffany, who both put this entire costume together, (with a little help from yours truly.)  Emily, my son’s fiance, won the “best makeup” award along with her partner David from the salon, also.  There’s a lot of creative talent at Mi Salon Spa.  The photo above was shot by Idajean Moore.  She and her husband Mike are co-owners of Mi Salon Spa.

Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt – Not Your Ordinary Challenge

Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

    The first step is removing the stretchers and the handle.  Yes, take a perfectly good umbrella and cut the handle out of it!  Open the umbrella completely and place upside down on your work surface.
   Using wire cutters, cut the stretchers, (the metal parts that stretch the umbrella open), close to the runner, (the part you push up the tube to open the umbrella), which will release the tension.  The umbrella will begin to collapse at this point.
 
   Cut the other end of the stretchers where they attach to the ribs.  By doing this, you should be removing each of the stretchers.   To release those, the first cut was close to the ribs.  Then, a second cut was made as close as possible to the part holding the stretcher on the rib.
 Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   With the wire cutters, cut the ribs close to the tube at the top.    Cutting close to the tube, try to cut a uniform circle around the canopy at the top of the umbrella, which will release the tube and handle. You should end up with a collapsed umbrella that looks like the picture below.  I wasn’t sure how much of the ribs I needed to use, so I left them long at first.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Pull the canopy up taut along each metal rib and secure with needle and thread just above where the stretcher was cut.  (This helps hold the lower part of the umbrella open.)
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
    After all the ribs have been stitched to the canopy, set the umbrella aside and begin the waistband.
 
   I had a scrap of black satin left over from another sewing project and that is what I chose to use for this waistband.Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Wanting the waistband to be two inches wide, I added 5/8″ at the top and 5/8″ at the bottom for seam allowance.  The piece of fabric was laid out and cut straight along the bottom cleaning up the edge.  Then,  with chalk, a 5 – 1/2″  line was marked along the folded fabric and then following the line cut with scissors.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Using the waist measurement I had taken earlier, 32 – 1/4″, I added 2-1/2″ to create a tab in the back, and 5/8″ seam allowance for each end of the waistband.   The resulting 5 – 1/2″ wide piece of fabric was cut to a 36″ length.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Mark the middle front on the Pellon interfacing.  Remember to deduct the 2″ tab.  Just fold the entire length in half minus the tab measure.  You will need this when you pin to the umbrella.
 
Fold the waistband in half lengthwise.  Mark one end for a tab, which will lap under in the back.Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Trim the interfacing along the tab edges to decrease bulk and get a sharper edge when turned right side out.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
    Turn right sides out and iron the waistband flat.  Take care to turn out the corners neatly.  Turn under one long edge 5/8″ and press with an iron.  
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
     Open up one seam at the top of the umbrella canopy, by removing the stitches down to the top of one of the metal ribs where it was stitched to the canopy.   (I opened up the seam right above the velcro tab that holds the umbrella tight when not in use.  Then, it would be in the back, too.)  That seam will be in the back.  I didn’t add a zipper.  The back was covered by the black trash bag train.
 
 
    At this point, I just guessed about where the waistband would fit, chose an arbitrary measurement, and marked the top of the umbrella with straight pins all the way around.  Right sides together, the ends were pinned lining up to the openings and the center, which was marked earlier and that marking was centered on the middle rib.  Then, the waistband was pinned to the umbrella, right sides together.  
 
   The waistband was a little too long.  I moved the pins down another inch.  Perfect.  This time, more pins were used and every seam was opened up down to the top edge of the waistband.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Measure from where the umbrella was cut at the top, making sure the line is pretty straight and equidistant from the top.  Line up the ends of the waistband, leaving the tab extending from one edge of the back.  (I made this one left over right.)   Line up the mark for the middle front and position it at the rib opposite the one lined up for the back opening.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   As you can see in the picture above, the seams were opened a little at the top to allow the waistband to be pinned and lay flat.  Leaving the top intact made it easier to be sure it was being pinned uniformly.  (As you can tell, I was cautious not to cut something off before I knew it was not needed!)
 
 
    First, baste the waistband onto the umbrella, making any adjustments if necessary.  Then, stitch the seam.  
 
   At this point, I decided to cut the ribs to fit right up against the bottom edge of the waistband.  Stretch one of the ribs out straight and up to the bottom edge of the waistband, cut the rib off.  Measure the length of that rib.  Then, measuring the same length from the bottom end of the rib, cut all of the ribs the same length.  (Be sure to measure from the bottom!  When the ribs were cut detaching the canopy from the tube of the umbrella, they were probably not all the same length!)
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Wrap the ends of the ribs with black electrical tape.  After I cut the ribs, I noticed there were little metal shavings that were irritating my fingertips.  Not wanting Ashley to experience this annoyance as she was putting the skirt on, and, or wearing it, I put the black electrical tape to good use. 
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com   After cutting the ribs and taping them, the folded edge of the waistband was pinned in place and hand sewn.  Then, the ends of the ribs were tacked securely to the canopy seam at the top of the skirt.   Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Two pieces of Velcro hook and loop were cut slightly smaller than the 2″ width of the waistband.  The hook sides were sewn to the end of the tab, which would be facing away from the wearer and the loop side was sewn onto the end of the waistband, which would be facing toward the person wearing it.
 
   The rib on the back seam was wrapped with the pressed edge of that seam and overhand stitched to the canopy fabric, securing the rib.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   At this point, the umbrella skirt should look like this!  Note that the Velcro loop is on the back side of the skirt.
 
   Now, to create the look of an opened umbrella, we need that 20″ hula hoop purchased from The Dollar Tree that was painted black in “Looking for a ‘Cosplay Batman’s Female Version of the Penguin Costume’ DIY? part- 1!
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   With needle and thread, attach the hula hoop to each of the ribs on the skirt where it will best open and stretch the ‘umbrella’ out to appear ‘open’.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Tiffany and Sydney made this train for the costume from trash bags!  Don’t the trash bag roses look neat?  They used a variety of black bags in different shades of black.  In the end, it was bustled at the top and attached to the waistband of the umbrella skirt in the back.
Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
   Thanks to Idajean for sharing her photos!  This picture shows off the ‘Pow’, which Tiffany made from felt and attached to the other umbrella she ordered from Amazon.Making A DIY Umbrella Skirt - Not Your Ordinary Challenge on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
      As you may be able to tell, I was flying by the seat of my pants on this one, but in addition to all the extra work done by the girls, it turned out beautiful, don’t you think?  Hope this inspires you, too!
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Cosplay Batman’s Female Penguin Costume DIY – Part 1

Cosplay Batman’s Female Penguin Costume DIY – Part 1
April 26, 2017
  Looking for a ‘Cosplay Batman’s Female Version of the Penguin Costume’ DIY?   Well, Making a DIY Umbrella Skirt and Waist Cincher is Not Your Ordinary Challenge!  However, this challenge was presented to me by my youngest daughter, who is an extremely good hair stylist at Mi Salon Spa. (No bias here at all.  Although, I will say that I have had many more compliments on my hair since she has been in charge of my color, cut, and hairstyle.)  
 Mi Salon Spa is the largest salon and day spa in Northern Kentucky.
 

   The salon was participating in the Aveda Catwalk for Water Cincinnati.  Two teams from the salon were designing costumes made mostly from recycled or recyclable items.

 
   Tiffany had decided to do a female version of the Penguin.  They were to recreate a Cosplay Comic book character.  She didn’t want to do what would ordinarily be expected.  You, know Cat Woman, Poison Ivy, Wonder Woman, etc.

Female Penguin Costume DIY

    Anyway, Ashley, the model above came to our home, where I measured her waist and planned how to transform one of the umbrellas, which Tiffany had bought on Amazon, into a skirt.   (We are an Amazon affiliate.  If you purchase from this link, we will receive a small percentage of the sale.  Thanks for supporting this website.)
   Sydney had already made the top hat out of cardboard.  They needed black electrical tape to cover the cardboard.  We had that.  (You can see in the picture below, Tiffany had sketched out her idea.  She is very artistic in her own right!)
How To Create Your Own 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY' on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
‘Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY’

 

   Then, they needed a purple ribbon to use for a band on the hat.  We had that upstairs in my ribbon stash.

Chopstick Waist Cincher

   They had decided to make a waist cincher from chopsticks, which they had brought with them.  We puzzled over how to string the sticks together.  At first, I suggested we could just drill holes in each of the chopsticks and run a string through those.  Then, came up with the idea of weaving them together, which seemed like an easier option.
   We measured how long the individual chopsticks needed to be to fit nicely at Ashley’s waist without spearing her above or below.  Then, the girls wove kite string under and over the sticks from one end to the other making several rows.  It held together nicely.
  But, we had to cut the sticks then.  My thought was to use a miter box and a miter hand saw. How difficult could that be?  Well, a little more difficult than you might think!  We finally, with a combined effort, cut through the chopsticks and you might have guessed, the sawing had taken its toll on the weaving job.
   No big deal, just weave again.  The girls straightened and arranged the sticks along the edge of a ruler taped to the counter.
Need A 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY? on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Waist Cincher

    Then, they began to weave.  It was difficult to weave under the sticks laying on the counter.  I suggested positioning them just over the edge, which helped a little.

Need Your Own 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY? on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Making The Waist Cincher – ‘Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY’

     Ultimately, Tiffany asked if I had any Styrofoam board.  Well, it just so happened I did and I quickly retrieved it from the basement storage room.

How To Create Your Own 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY' on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Waist Cincher

 

    The ruler was held in place by a few of the chopstick ends, which were to be discarded.  The pointed ends were poked through the Styrofoam pieces and the ends, which would lie at the waist, faced upward.   This worked pretty well and the girls had them woven together in no time.

 
   I asked how they were going to fasten it together in the back and even suggested ‘macrame’.  They were not jumping on that bandwagon.  So, I suggested weaving a ribbon or two through the sticks and leaving ends to tie in the back.  That seemed more palatable to them.
Waist Cincher Made From Chopsticks - 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY! on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Wasit Cincher

 

   The Styrofoam worked nicely and they had rewoven it for the fourth time, I believe, and the final time.  We had to laugh at some of our bumbles, but in the end, it did look pretty neat!

   We were brainstorming about a monocle and I just happened to remember I had a Tupperware cap for cola bottles.  Retrieving it from a drawer with plastic lids, etc., I saw a clear plastic water bottle cap.  I showed it to the girls and Sydney held it up to her eye.  Yes!
How To Create Your Own 'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY' on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
The Monocle

 Black Paint

   It was a little large and exaggerated, but we liked that!  It was lightweight.  So, using spirit gum, it could be glued to Ashley’s face.  A little bit of black paint first and it would be good to go!

'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY - How to. on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
Spray Paint The Elements Black

    The chopstick waist cincher, the plastic ring, and a hula hoop were all sprayed with black paint.   Using Krylon Colormaster Fusion for Plastic black spray paint, several thin coats were used, versus one heavy coat.  (You want to avoid drips!)  You can see the orange of the hula hoop.  The use for the hula hoop will be explained later!

(We are an affiliate of Amazon and will receive a small percentage of sales from this ad at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

Hair Foil Sheets?    

 
   The girls glued hair foil sheets to a black bra to create her stunning top.  They also hot glued shapes cut from black and white felt to resemble feathers to a couple of old shoulder pads, which I had saved.  At the top of one of the shoulder pads, they glued small mirror tiles for some flash.  You can see it in the top picture and the picture below. Unfortunately, I did not get a close-up of it!'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY - How to. on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
    This was a stunning outfit if you ask me!  What do you think?  Anyway, be sure to come back!  The complete detailed instructions for transforming an umbrella into a skirt and a closeup of the black trash bag train will be included in my next post.
'Cosplay Batman Penguin Costume DIY - How to. on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com
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