Kentucky Plants And Wildlife – A Day In The Kentucky Woods

Kentucky Plants And Wildlife – A Day In The Kentucky Woods
April 23, 2017
 

   Kentucky Plants And Wildlife – Since the weather was gorgeous this year during spring break, we took the grandkids for a day of adventure in the Kentucky woods.  (You know this has to be better than having them sit in front of some video game.)

    Middle Creek Park in Boone County Kentucky is a really nice place to just enjoy a walk in the woods.  The kids discovered lots of surprises in the woods.  You’d be surprised at how observant they really are.

    We found yellow trillium and purple trillium.

 

    We found ‘Blue-Eyed Mary’s’!  I had never seen these before and guessed they were probably some type of viola.  Wrong!  These wildflowers, apparently, thrive in low moist areas in woodland; and that is exactly where we found these.  There was just a beautiful blue and green carpet of these covering the woodland floor.

 

    We found a ladybug resting on a dried brown leaf.

    Aidan found a box turtle and wanted to take him home.  He probably would have changed his mind after carrying him around for while, but I explained that the woods was a really good home for him.  I suggested that saving one of those little turtles from a pet store was perhaps a better idea.  He agreed.

   As Aidan and Will walked along the creek, Will commented that Aidan was walking a little too close to the edge and might slide down into the creek.  A few seconds later, he was in water up to his knees.

  Then, there was Will’s nonchalant comment, “See, I told you.”

    After pushing his wet pants up to his knees, he felt he was already wet, might as well enjoy it.

   Aidan found these fossils and told us how he had learned about what they are on a school field trip.

 

   We found a fiddlehead fern.  The new growth of most ferns is called a fiddlehead.  The name fiddlehead is simply because the new fronds look like the decorative scrolled end on a fiddle.

 

    We saw wild blue phlox growing on the woodland floor.  Wild blue phlox grow in woodlands, wetlands, and along the edges of fields by the woods.  The petals are usually a blue or blue-violet color.

    The Virginia Bluebells,(Mertensia virginica), were blooming. They are easily recognizable because the little individual flowers have five petals that are fused together onto a long tube and they bloom in clusters.

   We saw bleeding hearts and these tiny white flowers, which we’ve identified as’Cleavers (Balium Aparine)‘, also known as Goosegras.  I love the leaves on this plant.

 

    These are some of the cutest little flowers!  They are called Dutchman’s Breeches, (Dicentra cucullaria).  These flowers resemble old-fashioned pantaloons hanging upside down.

 

   Star Chickweed, (Stellaria pubera), grow 6 – 12 inches high.  What appears to be ten petals on these are actually five petals, which are deeply partially divided into two.  The stamens are tipped with dark anthers that almost look like colored polka dots against the white flowers.

 

    And, of course, we saw May apples.  When the May apples are up, so are the morel mushrooms but we didn’t see any of those in this woods, unfortunately.

    

   The kids could not resist crossing the creek on this moss covered fallen log.  

    Aidan’s observant eye caught sight of several snails.  He was mesmerized by the tiny little creatures.  It’s amazing what you can find in the woods, isn’t it?

 

   The kids enjoyed fresh air, a long walk through the woods, and learned a thing or two on the way.  Frankly, I learned about some unfamiliar wildflowers, too.  Kentucky Native Plants And Wildlife – A Day In The Kentucky Woods and it was a memorable time for all.