How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine Cone Wreath

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine Cone Wreath

A beautiful, delicate, pine cone wreath caught my attention on Pinterest.  Attached to ribbons, the pine cones were delicately suspended from the wreath.  I had never seen this done before and felt I needed to make one of these.  The pine cone wreath on Pinterest was more natural and woodsy, however, the wreath in my vision had beautiful shiny silver pine cones.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

At first, the plan was to buy another grapevine wreath as the base, but when I went to the basement storage room, the DIY Christmas wreath I made a couple of years ago caught my eye.

Wouldn’t those silver pinecones look great with the sprigs of greenery and the little red berries?  The tiny silvery leaves would echo the silver!  So, there was the plan in a matter of seconds.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com


How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

All of the flowers and the ribbon bow were removed from the wreath.  There was basically a blank canvas.  Although the wreath previously had a coat of theDeluxe Snow Spray’, a few more light coats were sprayed over the front and sides of the wreath. 

 (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales through this link.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, the pinecones had to be spray painted silver.  The cinnamon scented pinecones were purchased at JoAnn Fabric and Craft store for half price.   They don’t have to be scented.  That was just a bonus!  A search for that ‘mirror’ spray paint at several of the craft stores was fruitless.  I settled for shiny silver spray paint, which ran about $3.oo.  (I read a review on the mirror paint and the lady wrote that it was just an overpriced silver paint, in her opinion, anyway.)

The pinecones were just placed in a shallow cardboard box and several light coats of the silver paint were sprayed over them, allowing them to dry between coats.  I didn’t get obsessive over this.  Some of the areas at the base of the pinecone petals were not covered, which was not a big deal.  The pinecones had a nice silver shine to them.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Using a drill and the smallest drill bit I have, a tiny hole was drilled in the top of the pinecone.  Some of the stems had to be removed before the surface was flat enough to be able to drill.  I just used the needle nose pliers to break the stem off to make it easier for drilling.  The hole makes it much easier to start the eye screw. 

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 The space where the stem was in these pinecones was limited.  It was necessary to remove a few of the petals around the stem on a couple of the cones.  My fingers would not fit to screw in the eye screw on several of them.  I could get them started but ended up using the needle nose pliers to finish the job.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The red ribbon is such a bright contrast to these silver pine cones!  I love it!  

Not sure how long I wanted the ribbons at first, a ribbon end was threaded through the eye screw and tied in a knot.  The wreath was hung on the closet door so the ribbon lengths could be determined.  The ribbon was draped through the wreath and allowed to hang down, while the other end was held and manipulated until a decision was made on the length of the longest one.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

  

 

Then, the ribbon was cut and another pine cone was attached to the loose end.  (I already liked this pine cone wreath at this point!)

 

That process was used to decide how long each length of ribbon, with pine cones attached, needed to be.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

Once I was happy with the positioning of the pine cones on the ribbon, the tiny silver spray with the red berries was wired to the bottom half of the wreath.

Then, a bow from red ribbon was made.  I stood back and looked at it and decided that bow that was removed from the original wreath was really perfect for this wreath, too!  

Once it was attached to the wreath, there was still something lacking.  The top half looked plain.  It needed something delicate to balance what was going on at the bottom of the wreath.  After scouring the craft stores, fabric stores, department stores, etc., nothing seemed quite right.  The unfinished wreath sat here for a week. 

Then, I went to Michael’s and they had all of their tiny ornaments on sale – 70% off the regular price!  There were little boxes of 1″ diameter silver ornaments and I could envision them on the wreath as the perfect subtle finishing touch.  They set me back $1.80!

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

To attach them to the wreath, instead of using hangers, a piece of wire was cut and shaped into a ‘U’ resembling a hairpin.   Then, the wire was slipped through the hanger on top of the ornament and twisted to hold it securely.  The two loose wires were then twisted around the branches on the wreath so they would hold more securely.

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

The wreath was hung in the dining room.  Although this pine cone wreath has a pop of red, it really seems quietly elegant, doesn’t it?

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Actually, the title of this post could have been, How To Make A Beautiful Delicate Pine cone Wreath For Next To Nothing!

How To Make A Beautiful Delicate PineCone Wreath on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget – Part 3

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget – Part 3

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath

Finishing the pumpkin wreath will go more quickly than preparing the pumpkin and the arms.  Those took a little time but we are there now!  Thankfully, it will be ready before Halloween!

The arms, shoulders, and hands were completely wrapped in the paper strips.  The Papier mâché glue was applied with a paint brush just like before.  Then, the piece was allowed to dry. Some heavier paper was used at the elbows and the shoulders and a little extra bulk was added, too.

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

I wanted the hands and arms to look skinny and some of the lines from the cable to be accentuated in the hands.  When the paper was applied there, I took care to press it down alongside of the cable.

Drying time is all relative to humidity and sunshine.  One day, I put one of the pumpkin heads on the table on the patio, the sun was shining brightly, and there was no humidity.  That one was almost dry by the end of the day!  If you remember the first pumpkin I made, it took days!  Looking back, it was the weather that slowed the process.

 

After the piece was dry, clay was applied over the paper strips.  Since I was doing this on a flat surface, only one side could be worked on at a time.  You can see in the picture that balls of clay were applied where the knuckles should be.  Then, the clay was pressed around the edges and gently blended into the base coat of clay.  It’s beginning to look like a creepy hand now, right?

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

One side of the arms, shoulders, and hands was covered in the Papier mâché clay. ◄(You can find the recipe for the paste and clay here.)  That was allowed to dry.  Then, the other side was covered with the clay.  The hands had to be done in a few settings and allowed to dry between settings because of how close the fingers were to each other.   It was much easier to allow the fingers to dry and then apply clay to the one right next to it.

After the entire piece was covered in the clay and allowed to dry,  Valspar Black 60074 – Flat paint, was painted over one side.  The paint was allowed to dry and then, the other side got a coat of the paint.

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Some of the Kilz primer was dry brushed over top of the arms and hands.  Then, I mixed a little black acrylic craft paint into some white acrylic craft paint to create a light gray paint and dry brushed it over the areas where the primer was.  The dry brushing just brought out more of the knuckle detail and the texture of the clay.

 

 

 

 

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

The pumpkin had to be attached to the wreath in some way.   I decided upon using fishing line.  That meant it had to be threaded through the pumpkin somehow.  

Using a small drill bit, I drilled two holes in the back of the pumpkin toward the top.  These were barely visible but the fishing line was easy to thread through one of the holes.

In order to take less tension or stress off of the points where the fishing line went through the pumpkin, a sleeve from a mechanical pencil was used to absorb some of that.  The fishing line was threaded through the hole drilled in the back of the pumpkin, through the sleeve, and out the other hole.  That should spread the stress all across the back of the pumpkin instead of on two little spots.

  Going in was easy.  Bring the line back out from the inside was not.  I ended up threading the line through a needle and using it to pull the thread through.  That worked nicely.

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

This is the back side of the frame.  You can see the eye screws were attached to the frame on the indentation where the glass and picture would normally be placed.  A small hole was drilled before screwing each of the eye screws into the wood.  It makes it much easier.

Felt pads were also glued on the back of the frame so the front door would not be scratched up by the frame. It probably cuts down on the noise of it banging against the door, too.  The zip ties were threaded through the eye screws and around each of the arms, securing them to the frame.  The shoulder piece was also zip tied securely.  

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

I left the ends sticking out in this picture so you could see where they were placed.    Then, using the fishing line threaded through the pumpkin head, the line was tied onto the two eye screws at the top of the frame.  (I used a double piece of line to thread through the pumpkin.  It will hold more weight and is much easier to tie.)

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using PicMonkey Editor, the sign was created.  The background was first created using the papyrus option under textures.  The typeface is ‘Face Your Fears’.  On top of that, I used an overlay  from the Vampires theme, the one with the tombstones.   The fade was increased a bit until the words showed up well but the tombstones were still recognizable.

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

When I was happy with the results, the sign was printed on regular copy paper.  The paper was then attached to a black foam core poster board, which had been picked up at the dollar store.  Using an X-Acto knife, the paper and the foam core were cut neatly.  The white inner core of the black board showed on the edges and a black marker was used to cover it on all four sides.Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Then, more exterior Mod Podge was painted over the printed sign, the back, and a coat on the sides.  A couple more coats were painted over the sign, allowing each layer to dry before adding another.

 

 

 

 

After the pumpkin head was tied onto the frame, I picked up the black thorny branches used on the skeleton wreath.  It just seemed something was missing at the top of the frame and the branches just seemed perfect.  Three of the branches were hot glued together toward the base of the branches.  Fishing line was used to tied them to the frame and a little hot glue for extra support.  The dried leaves got a couple of coats of Mod Podge and were strategically placed to hide the fishing line.

Finishing The Pumpkin Wreath - How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 3 - on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

The process of  “How to Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget” has taken some time but I am so excited to see how people respond!   Finishing the pumpkin wreath – part 3, hope you have enjoyed this and hope it inspires you to create your own!  

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

 

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath – Part 2 – Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

 

Part 2 – The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders

So, I decided to use the cable for the ‘skeleton’, the arms, hands,and shoulders, for this figure.  It’s pliable to begin with, and by the time all of the paper is glued to it, it will be stiffened.  (If he were going to be standing, a more stable frame would probably be necessary.) In  the picture below, you can already see how the arm on the left is becoming more rigid.   The newspaper page I used on the arms is a little heavier than your run of the mill newspaper.

I cut a cable long enough to allow for shoulders and the two arms.  Although I was planning to use PVC pipe for the shoulders, I had a heavy cardboard tube from a package of aluminum foil and decided to use it.   You can see the cable is  crimped up on each side of the tube, which helps hold the tube in place.  I also flattened the cardboard tube in the middle so the pumpkin head could sit on top of it.  (That would have been a lot harder to do with a PVC pipe.)

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You can see how the ends of the cable coating were sliced, splayed, and the wire ends exposed.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Then, the ends were spread around the ‘arm’ above the wrist and hand and using masking tape, secured the cable to the wrist and hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

 

My plan was to have the hands positioned like they were pulling the figure up and out of the frame on the bottom of the frame.  Trying to think how I would pull myself out of a frame, I moved his right hand to the bottom and then the left hand to the top corner of the frame.  Then, I saw a picture where the figure was offering one hand, beckoning you to come with him.  Ohhh!  That was perfect!  Now, he will look like he is reaching down and offering a hand to pull you into the frame!

So, I placed the shoulders and arms into the frame.  The piece fits perfectly against the sides of the inner frame walls.  Using eye screws, I can secure the arms to the sides of the frame.

The pumpkin head laid on top of the flattened cardboard tube looked great.  The head will be attached with fishing line or metal wire.  Two little holes drilled into the back will allow the wire to go through one and out the other and attached to eye screws in the frame.  To spread out the load on the wire or line, the wire will be run through an old marker tube.  Then, there will be less stress on the two points where the wire or line touch the pumpkin head.

The space below seemed to need something.  I picked up the sign from the skeleton wreath and placed it there.  Yes, I think a sign there would be perfect.  Now, I need to come up with the perfect words…  Any ideas?

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath - Part 2 The Arms, Hands, and Shoulders on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

In the meantime, the arms, hands, and shoulders will be receiving more Papier mâché and, ultimately, paper clay.  

Click here to see ►Part 1 of How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget.

 

Please follow and like us:

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget

This is not your typical Halloween ‘Pumpkin Wreath’!  Remember the Skeleton Wreath I made a couple of years ago?  How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comWell, I decided to update the decoration, disassemble the skeleton wreath, and the idea of a pumpkin wreath began to take shape in my mind using the black frame again.

James Whitcomb Riley, the Indiana Poet,  and his Little Orphant Annie poem was my inspiration.  My mother read this to us when my siblings and I were little, and believe it, or not, I memorized it.  It is probably my favorite poem of all time, especially the part about the little boy who wouldn’t say his prayers.

No, I didn’t want a sweet little pumpkin wreath.  From Riley’s poem:

An’ the Gobble-uns’ll git you
Ef you
Don’t
Watch
Out!

The vision I had was a creepy pumpkin crawling out of the frame.  That is why I have been making Papier mâché pumpkins.  They were the practice leading up to this ‘Pumpkin Wreath’.  (You can find the instructions for the Papier mâché pumpkins by clicking on the link.)

After making these pumpkins, I can tell  you it is a fun process and I am afraid this Papier mâché has become an obsession…an addiction…  I love it!  There will be more Papier mâché creations!  

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Well, here are some of the elements to begin this wreath.  The pumpkin head has a first layer of paper clay in this picture.  The pumpkin also has a flat back because of the plan to place him in the picture frame.  I also made the hole in the back instead of the bottom.  Hopefully, that was a good decision.

This creepy cloth was found at the craft store.  Wanting some type of pliable wire to create a skeleton for the hands, I asked Dave if we had any coaxial cable (We are an Amazon affiliate and may receive a small percentage of any sales from this link at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting this website!)

It took no time for him to bring this to me.  He even offered to strip the cable, which would have left me with three individual wires but why not use the whole thing?

First, using my hand as a guide and adding length to it for a bigger hand, I cut the cable for the thumb and each of the fingers.How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

 

Then, I cut a double of each of those lengths.  The small finger ended up being 11″, the ring finger  11 -1/2″, the middle finger 13 – 1/4″,  the forefinger 11 – 3/4″, and the thumb – 10″.  These measurements are not critical!  This is a monster!  Use your imagination and create your own!

Lay the cable out with the thumb on one side, the forefinger length next to it, the middle finger, the ring finger, and lastly the little finger section.                                                                  

Gather the cable up, adjust the cable, trying to keep the fingers in the correct position, and wrap masking tape around the “wrist”.  Begin spreading the cable out to resemble the hand.  I kept referring to my own hand to judge where the hand needed to flare and where the thumb would need to be.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

You might have seen where other people have used old marker tubes to create the segments of the fingers, which was my original plan, but this cable was thick enough that I didn’t feel like I needed that after all.  I kind of like it being long and skinny.

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

You can see where the thumb was positioned out and away from the forefinger piece and masking tape was wrapped around it.  It is beginning to look like a hand isn’t it? 

The next step was to wrap the entire hand piece with the masking tape.   The tape was used to create the palm and back of the hand.  Small pieces of tape were torn and placed over the ends of the fingers and then each of the fingers was wrapped.  Paper strips and clay will add more detail to the hands.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

These hands will look like they are pulling the pumpkin figure up and out of the black frame.  At least that is the plan!   You can see I’ve already begun to shape the hands in appropriate positions.  Even though they are easily manipulated right now, after the Papier mâché clay is applied, they won’t be as pliable.

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Figuring out the arms and shoulders and adding the Papier mâché will be the next steps.  Part 2 of “How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget” will be shared later this week.

Has this inspired you to create your own pumpkin wreath?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make A Pumpkin Wreath No One Will Forget on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

 

Please follow and like us:

Burlap 4th of July Wreath – DIY

Burlap 4th of July Wreath – DIY

Burlap 4th of July Wreath – DIY!  It seems that they are all over the place but scanning through pins on Pinterest, I found an idea for a burlap wreath which was very clever.   On Hometalk, Trace Stagg of Sea Trace Creations made a burlap wreath for four seasons using removable decorations.  Using her idea for the wreath base and burlap, I’ve created a patriotic 4th of July wreath!

The wreath form is made from a pool noodle.  You know those cheap ones from the dollar store?  Burlap is needed to cover the noodle.   You’ve seen the ones where people tie the burlap or fabric around them but this one had a twist.  Trace made a sleeve of the burlap and slipped it around the pool noodle!  This takes less than a yard of burlap.  The edges were left to fray.  I love this!

How To Make The Burlap Wreath Base

Supplies Needed:  Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

  • pool noodle
  • scissors
  • burlap
  • wire for a hanger
  • stick from the yard
  • Duck tape
  • hot glue

 

First, cut the noodle diagonally on one end.  I used a serrated knife.  Pull the other end up and mark where to cut to match the diagonal of the first cut.  Cut the second end.

Find a stick about the size of the hole through the pool noodle.  The stick we used was about 5″ long.  This will be used to connect the two ends.Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Lay the burlap out and wrap around the pool noodle to decide how wide the burlap needs to be cut to cover the noodle and be sure to allow extra fabric for overhang.  If you want 1-inch overhang, add 2-inches, one for each side.   The ones cut for this project were cut 8-1/4″ wide.  You need to measure the one you have.  There are different sizes of the pool noodles.  Remember you will have to slide the noodle through the sleeve.  You don’t want it too tight so it will be easy to do this. Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Mark the fabric and cut 2  lengths of the fabric from the selvage edges to the fold.  You can cut additional lengths depending on how gathered you want your wreath to be. (This wreath has 2 lengths sewn together, end to end.) 

 

 

 

The burlap lengths can be glued together like Trace did or they can be stitched by hand or machine.  I decided to stitch these end to end with a sewing machine using a basting stitch.Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Next, I stitched each loose seam allowance to the burlap so they would lay flat.Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Then, with the seam allowances to the inside, the burlap was folded in half, long edges together.  Using straight pins, the long sides were pinned together, marking where the seam should be sewn.  (I used the pins as a guide for the seam.)

Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

After stitching the entire length and creating a sleeve, the pool noodle was slipped into the sleeve, gathering as it was pulled onto the noodle.  I used the seam as a guide to keep each side even.  The seam was lined up with the middle of the noodle.  I didn’t measure.  The noodle was just pulled together to make the circle and the middle of the bottom edge was marked with a straight pin.Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Both ends of the sleeve were rolled back to reveal the ends of the pool noodle to be glued.  Hot glue was applied to one-half of the stick and inserted into the hole of one end of the pool noodle.  More hot glue was applied to the remainder of the stick and the cut surface of the pool noodle on both ends.  The ends were brought together firmly and held for a minute.

Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Using Duck tape or duct tape, the seam was wrapped and secured where the two ends come together.   Roll the ends back over the tape and bring together to completely cover the tape.  A wire wreath hanger can be fashioned from florist wire.  Additional threads can be removed from the outside edges and frayed more if desired.

Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

At this point, the wreath base is complete.  Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.comIsn’t this so clever?

From here, the sky is the limit.  Add flowers, flags, ribbons, bows, and whatever speaks to you.  Trace made her decorations removable so she could change it for each of the seasons.

 

 

 

 

   As you can see in the picture, I added a flag, a red burlap bow, some silk hydrangea, and some silk leaves.  Believe it or not, this wreath was made with items and fabric I already had except for the ribbon.  That was purchased for 50% off at the fabric store!Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Can you believe how simple this Burlap 4th of July Wreath – DIY really is?Burlap 4th of July Wreath - DIY on MyHumbleHomeandGarden.com

Please follow and like us:

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)